Economist Radio

Economist Radio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist News 1944 rész The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white…
Checks and Balance: Size matters
39 perc 1944. rész

President Biden wants a big infrastructure bill to follow the stimulus cash he has handed out. It would add up to a $5 trillion overhaul of America. A splurge on this scale has long been taboo in mainstream politics. Is big government back?


The Economist’s public policy editor Sacha Nauta and Henry Curr, our economics editor, join the discussion.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


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Growth and stagnation: Bangladesh’s first 50 years
21 perc 1943. rész

The country has empowered its women, established itself as a garment-industry powerhouse and vastly improved public health—but its politics remains troubled. The pandemic has not reduced average global happiness, but rather reshaped it: the old are more content and the young less so. And a look at the staggering costs of the Suez Canal blockage. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Ursula Burns
21 perc 1942. rész

Is it time for diversity quotas? Ursula Burns, the first black woman to lead a Fortune 500 company, tells The Economist’s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes why she thinks businesses will not diversify without quotas. The former CEO of Xerox also argues that business leaders have the edge over presidents when it comes to closing the skills gap and explains why she became an engineer rather than a nun. 


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Export-control panel: the EU meets on vaccines
22 perc 1941. rész

European leaders will address the thorny question of vaccine-export controls today. We look at the row with Britain and what it means for the broader relationship with the EU. Our correspondent visits Congo-Brazzaville as the president of nearly 37 years triumphs again—at a continuing cost to his people. And research suggests that Europe’s most inbred rulers were the least adept.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Shooting out the messenger
26 perc 1940. rész

The pandemic has fueled the rapid advancement of emerging biotechnologies. The Economist’s science editor explores the potential of RNA beyond covid-19. Also, theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli explains the implications of quantum physics on our interactions with objects. And, creating self-healing materials where roads repair themselves. Kenneth Cukier hosts


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Can’t take a hike: more economic turmoil in Turkey
21 perc 1939. rész

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan just does not like interest-rate rises. So he has again sacked a central-bank governor given to imposing them—again, to his own peril. America’s love of free markets extends also to the business of sperm donation; our correspondent discusses the risks that come with so little regulation. And the opera composer who is shaking up stereotypes.

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Money Talks: Over the great wall
26 perc 1938. rész

Against the backdrop of sanctions and retaliations, China's capital markets are increasingly interwoven with global finance—what will this mean for foreign investors? Plus, will President Joe Biden’s fiscal stimulus trigger a dreaded return to high inflation—with global consequences? And, a new generation of workers' unions takes on the tech giants. Simon Long hosts.


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Always be their Bibi? Israel votes, again
20 perc 1937. rész

It’s the fourth poll in two years, but a stable government is still far from guaranteed. We examine the firm grip Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu still has on Israeli politics. In the Philippines, children have been cooped up at home for a year—but citizens seem to buy into the government’s rationale. And the real history of the chocolate chip cookie.

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The Jab: Will America do better than Europe?
44 perc 1936. rész

The EU was slow to roll out covid-19 vaccines, then destroyed confidence in the Astrazeneca vaccine and is now embroiled in a row over supplies. Will America avoid Europe's pitfalls? Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Biden, explains vaccination progress in America, the plateau of new infections and his plan to combat new variants. Also, how does America's federal system affect the vaccination programme?


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor and our New York correspondent Rosemarie Ward join them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts

 

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Not-purchasing power: boycotts in Myanmar
20 perc 1935. rész

As demonstrations against February’s coup continue, many are trying a subtler form of resistance: starving army-owned businesses of revenue. We ask whether the ploy will work. Snippets of Neanderthal DNA survive in most humans—and they are a mixed blessing as regards the risks of covid-19. And, not for the first time, Britain’s census questions reveal the preoccupations of a nation.

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Editor’s Picks: March 22nd 2021
39 perc 1934. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to deal with China, Biden’s border bind (12:01) and how the pandemic has changed the shape of global happiness (27:34). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: No vacancy
43 perc 1933. rész

“Don’t come over” is Joe Biden’s message to migrants. Rumours that it’s easier to enter the United States since he became president are fuelling a humanitarian crisis at the southern border. The president needs a firmer grip on the issue, but his favoured centre ground is barren. How should he respond?


The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass reports from South Texas, we look back on Ronald Reagan’s big immigration reform, and speak to Ali Noorani of the National Immigration Forum.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Another race question: murder in Atlanta
19 perc 1932. rész

A shooting in the city left eight dead, six of them women of East Asian descent. We examine the past and present of anti-Asian sentiment in America. Frontex, Europe’s border-enforcement agency, is rising in clout and requisitioning more kit; we look at the closest the bloc has come to having a standing army. And why managers should tackle nonsensical workplace rules.

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The Economist Asks: Joanna Coles & Melora Hardin
30 perc 1931. rész

Record numbers of women are considering leaving the workforce due to the pressures of the pandemic. How can successful women help their successors through the glass ceiling? Host Anne McElvoy talks to Joanna Coles, CEO of Northern Star Investments and former chief content officer of Hearst magazines, and Melora Hardin, star of “The Bold Type” and “The Office”, about why audiences enjoy portrayals of monstrous women bosses and the best—and worst—career advice they have received. Plus, has the pandemic slain the stiletto? 


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Forces to be reckoned with: Afghan peace talks
22 perc 1930. rész

Negotiations in Moscow may at last forge agreement between the Afghan government and Taliban insurgents; that, in turn, would inform America’s long-promised drawdown. The International Criminal Court can investigate crimes against humans, but there is a push to make injury to the environment a high crime, too. And a look at Britney Spears’s conservatorship, a legal arrangement ripe for abuse. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Baidu it
24 perc 1929. rész

As the Chinese tech giant Baidu prepares for a secondary listing on the Hong Kong stock exchange, how will Baidu’s rise influence technological innovation in China and beyond? Also, the humidity inside facemasks is helpful in fighting covid-19, not just preventing transmission. And Dr Tolullah Oni, an urban epidemiologist, on improving health in rapidly growing cities. Kenneth Cukier hosts 



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Harms weigh: AstraZeneca vaccine fears
22 perc 1928. rész

Scattered reports of blood clots have sparked curbs across Europe, even though the jab is almost certainly safe. We take a hard look at the risks in relative terms. After Canada arrested a Huawei executive in 2018, China detained two Canadians—we examine the hostage diplomacy still playing out. And how “non-fungible tokens” may benefit digital artists of all sorts. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: The retail revolution
29 perc 1927. rész

The shopping industry is in a state of flux. Smartphones and social media are enabling a data-driven transformation that is only just getting started. Host Henry Tricks investigates whether the future of shopping will be ruled by giants and how personal data will increasingly shape not just what gets bought, and where, but even what gets made. Could a new generation of consumers change capitalism for the better?


With David Liu, vice president of strategy at Pinduoduo, Harley Finkelstein, president of Shopify, Nilam Ganenthiran, president of Instacart, and Katie Hunt, cofounder of Showfields.


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Earning them: Stripe’s monster valuation
20 perc 1926. rész

The firm got in early providing online-payment software to tech startups. Now it’s the most valuable Silicon Valley darling yet. We look at its future prospects. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo faces a raft of allegations and widespread calls to quit; our correspondent reckons he will not go anywhere without a fight. And the Kabul beauty trend that keeps growing.

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The Jab: How will behaviour change?
40 perc 1925. rész

The world has stumbled through the pandemic by nationalising risk. In heavily infected countries citizens have been ordered to stay home for weeks at a time. As covid-19 vaccination programmes spread, governments must gradually restore choice to the individual. How?


We speak to Ozlem Tureci and Ugur Sahin—the couple who co-founded BioNTech which created the first covid-19 vaccine to get regulatory approval. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. The Economist's deputy editor Edward Carr, Europe correspondent Vendeline Von Bredow and Dan Rosenheck from our data team join them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts


 

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Redrawing the map: a fragmented Syria
22 perc 1924. rész

As the country marks ten years of civil war, the economy is crippled; it has broken up into statelets and ethnic enclaves that may never be reunified. Violence against women is sparking a global wave of protest. We examine why it is more widespread, and more damaging, in the poor world. And the creature that can shed its entire body. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: March 15th 2021
28 perc 1923. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Joe Biden’s economic experiment, Rupert Murdoch at 90 (09:50) and, the art of coining new words (21:50) 


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Checks and Balance: Fixer upper
41 perc 1922. rész

President Biden’s vast economic rescue package has passed without scrutiny or input from Republicans. Meanwhile House Democrats’ plan to protect voting rights will founder so long as the Senate has the filibuster. What’s the best way to fix American democracy?


Our Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon joins the discussion and we hear from Congresswomen Katie Porter, a proponent of the voting reform bill. The Economist’s Matt Steinglass explores the eccentricity of the supermajority.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state
22 perc 1921. rész

As the Biden administration fires a $1.9trn pandemic-relief bazooka, we consider how governments might rethink welfare: providing more-flexible benefits, investing in human capital and acting as an insurer against the gravest risks. The simple pleasure of human touch, so constrained of late, is not an emotional luxury—it’s a physical need. And why it’s so hard to coin a word.

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The Economist Asks: Philippa Perry
28 perc 1920. rész

During the pandemic, how can we better parent our children? Psychotherapist and writer Philippa Perry talks to Anne McElvoy about the mental-health consequences for the 1.6 billion students kept out of school during the pandemic. Plus, why the idea of quality time is a “cop-out” and feeling sad is part of being human. 


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Nuclear inaction: the legacy of Fukushima
22 perc 1919. rész

The cleanup effort in and around the melted-down power plant is still progressing, but rebuilding communities—and, crucially, trust—is proving far more difficult. As Rupert Murdoch turns 90 we look at how his businesses are faring, and how they are likely to be run by his heirs. And the Victorian strongman who was arguably the world’s first fitness influencer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Coronavirus, a year on
23 perc 1918. rész

A year ago the World Health Organisation declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. The Economist’s health-care correspondent reflects on the future path of covid-19 infections. Also, how have past pandemics shaped today's society? And, epidemiologist Professor Dame Anne Johnson explores the opportunities for the “new normal”. Kenneth Cukier hosts


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Whither permitting? Vaccine passports
18 perc 1917. rész

Formalising systems to divide the vaccinated from the unvaccinated is neither as risky nor as useful as many people think. In any case, vaccine passports are coming. On the anniversary of Tibet’s uprising, we examine how pressure on Tibetan Buddhism is rising, with dark parallels to Uyghur Muslims’ plight. And why it’s time to close the gate on duty-free shopping.

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Money Talks: SPAC to the future
26 perc 1916. rész

Special-purpose acquisition companies are Wall Street’s latest craze, attracting everyone from celebrities to retail investors. An alternative to the traditional IPO, SPACs could transform tech investing and supercharge innovation. They are even shaping the post-Brexit battle to be Europe’s financial capital. But are these “blank-cheque firms” a mania, a useful innovation, or both? Simon Long hosts.


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Reconciled to it: America’s stimulus bill
21 perc 1915. rész

Thanks to a parliamentary contortion called reconciliation, the $1.9trn covid-relief plan is likely to sail through—we examine what is in it and what its passage portends for lawmaking in the Biden era. Unrest is unusual in Senegal, but citizens are out in force; we ask about the roots of the protest mood. And what ever happened to bespoke ringtones?

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The Jab: Trial and error?
37 perc 1914. rész

Large scale covid-19 vaccine trials have taken place at exceptional speed with unprecedented scrutiny. How do they work? And why are the results so politically charged? 


We speak to Andrew Catchpole, lead scientist on the first trial to infect volunteers with the virus intentionally. Jason Palmer, presenter of The Intelligence, assists in a trial. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, and James Fransham, from our data team, join them.


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Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil
22 perc 1913. rész

State and local pandemic responses are scattershot; a national effort is all but nonexistent. A creeping sense of fatalism makes for peril far beyond the country’s borders. Aggregate American jobs numbers are promising, but our correspondent digs deeper to find how much harder women have it in the labour force. And the interview set to widen Britain’s royal rift. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: March 8th 2021
32 perc 1912. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make a social safety net for the post-covid world, the lessons of Fukushima (9:) And two nations under God (16:30).

 

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Checks and Balance: Sequel opportunities
39 perc 1911. rész

Donald Trump has emerged from purdah at a meeting of conservative activists, hinting at another presidential run. Even in defeat the former President retains control of a party united in antipathy to liberal elites. Where does cleaving to culture leave Republicans?


We look at the legacy of Rush Limbaugh, who pioneered Trump’s brand of anti-elitism, and speak to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, one of America’s most popular Republicans.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Rubber-stamping ground: China’s parliament meets
21 perc 1910. rész

The National People’s Congress kicked off with two big signals of Beijing’s intentions: a return to economic-growth targets and a plan to eradicate Hong Kong’s vestiges of democracy. On the first-ever papal visit to Iraq, Pope Francis hopes to give succour to the country’s beleaguered Christians. And the continued tribulations of the nightclub scene.

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The Economist Asks: Sir Kazuo Ishiguro
31 perc 1909. rész

What can artificial intelligence reveal about what it means to be human? Host Anne McElvoy asks the Nobel prize-winning author of "The Remains of the Day” about his new book, "Klara and the Sun", in which he argues that people's relationship to machines will eventually change the way they think of themselves as individuals. But does he think only humans are capable of love? And what do he and his author daughter argue about?

 

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Exit stages left: America and the Middle East
21 perc 1908. rész

The Biden administration would like to pull back from the region; America’s strategic interests have changed, as have regional dynamics. We examine the careful exit that is possible. To evade censors China’s cinephiles often turn to pirated versions of foreign films, but the volunteers who subtitle them are under increasing pressure. And researchers make a connection with the dream world. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Variations on a gene
24 perc 1907. rész

As global vaccination efforts continue, how is the coronavirus mutating to stay ahead? The head of Britain's covid-19 genomics consortium explains why genetic sequencing is crucial. Also, how studying individual cancer genes may improve precision treatments. And an AI for an eye—host Kenneth Cukier investigates the potential of AI in medicine first hand.



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Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget
22 perc 1906. rész

The finance minister has a plan that will keep many safeguards in place—for now. We ask how the country will then dig itself out of a financial hole. As countries aim for net-zero emissions, how to pick the policies that do the most good for the least cash? And why every fruit tree in Zanzibar has an owner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Bonds, shaken and stirred
25 perc 1905. rész

Last week’s turmoil in the bond market has calmed for now, but fears of inflation mean more turbulence ahead. Plus, how poor countries trying to secure debt relief are caught in a minefield of lenders’ competing priorities and egos. And, host Simon Long takes a lesson from a former hostage negotiator in the secrets of successful listening.


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A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia
22 perc 1904. rész

It is becoming more certain that war crimes are being committed in the northern region of Tigray. Yet, despite increasing international pressure, there is little hope the suffering will soon end. In China anti-capitalist sentiment is growing online; overworked youth have a decidedly Maoist view of the country’s biggest businesses and tycoons. And the uphill struggles of France’s skiing industry.

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The Jab: Will there be enough vaccines?
40 perc 1903. rész

It is one thing to design and test covid-19 vaccines. It is another to make them at sufficient scale to generate the billions of doses needed to vaccinate the world’s population. How are the vaccines produced, why is production so variable and will it meet demand this year?


We speak to Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India, the world's biggest supplier of vaccines. The Economist’s technology correspondent Hal Hodson explains why some vaccines take longer to produce than others. James Fransham from our data team discusses when supply will meet demand.


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Oliver Morton, The Economist's briefing editor, joins them.


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Coup fighters: Myanmar’s persistent protesters
20 perc 1902. rész

The temperature keeps rising: as demonstrations continue to grow, the army is becoming more brutal. We ask how the country can escape the cycle of violence. In a pandemic, laws against misinformation have their merits—but are also easily put to work for censorious governments. And why British dependencies want to get growing in the medical-marijuana game.

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Editor’s Picks: March 1st 2021
29 perc 1901. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the superpowers' tug of war for South-East Asia, America digital markets shift towards oligopolies (09:48) the future of homeschooling post pandemic (18:54)


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Checks and Balance: Back problems
41 perc 1900. rész

“America is back” President Biden has told allies. Hard power, including a fearsome nuclear weapons arsenal, is the foundation of America’s global influence. But many Democrats would like to demilitarise foreign policy. Can Joe Biden live up to his own rhetoric as he tries to re-engage with the world? 


We hear from Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Fiona Hill, who advised President Trump on Russia. Our obituaries editor Ann Wroe profiles George Shultz, architect of the first arms control treaty. 


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan
20 perc 1899. rész

The presidents of Turkey and Russia make an odd couple; their former empires have clashed over centuries. We look at the fragile—but nonetheless worrisome—alliance between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. India’s economy is recovering but a longstanding drag on growth persists: the overwhelming fraction of women absent from the labour force. And an unlikely protest anthem rattles Cuba’s regime. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill
31 perc 1898. rész

How should President Joe Biden deal with President Vladimir Putin? At a point of “acute confrontation” between America and Russia, Fiona Hill, former official at the US National Security Council and expert on Russia, tells Anne McElvoy how post-Trump relations might look. Also, why Russian opposition figurehead Alexei Navalny is like Harry Potter— challenging a ruthless leader. Also, was Hill herself poisoned on a research trip in Russia in 2002?


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Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped
22 perc 1897. rész

The notionally dollar-pegged “stablecoin” quietly underpins many crypto-market moves. We ask what the currency issuer’s clash with New York authorities means for the wider crypto craze. In many African countries, parliamentarians are asked to fill public-service gaps—at great personal cost. We examine moves toward a fairer forking out of funds. And why physical-education exams are popping up in China.

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Babbage: Collusions and collisions
26 perc 1896. rész

After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts 



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Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles
21 perc 1895. rész

Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours.

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Money Talks: Pricing pollution
26 perc 1894. rész

Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, founder of Nubank a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


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Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks
20 perc 1893. rész

President Joe Biden’s top posts are shaping up as Senate confirmation hearings continue—but some controversial nominations await a vote. We look at who is on the docket. Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become messy, at the expense of some promised and much-needed reforms. And why the global rap scene is picking up a London accent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?
36 perc 1892. rész

Three vaccines have been approved by stringent regulators. Ten are being used in one or more countries. How do they work and are they effective enough against new variants of the coronavirus?


Sarah Gilbert, inventor of the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine, tells us adapting to new variants should be easy. The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie reports from China, which faces a huge test of its homegrown vaccine technology as it tries to re-open. James Fransham from our data team on how far the variants have spread.


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, joins them.


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The World Ahead: When cities breathe out
20 perc 1891. rész

Covid-19 has dented the prosperity, populations and popularity of big cities around the world. But adapting to shocks is what great cities do. How will urban centres change in the post-pandemic world and what are the political implications of a shift towards more remote working from suburban areas? Tom Standage hosts.

 

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Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president
19 perc 1890. rész

Andrés Manuel López Obrador roared into office with a grand “fourth transformation” agenda. Even after two years of policy failures and power-grabbing, he remains wildly popular. An eye-catching new report implores economists to take biodiversity into account—and puts some sobering limits on growth. And a chat through the state of the art in conversational computers.

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Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021
19 perc 1889. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ambitious attempt to deal with climate change, why SPACs are a useful way to take firms public (08:52) and how data on inbred nobles support a leader-driven theory of history (15:16)

 

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Checks and Balance: The switch
45 perc 1888. rész

Plans to overhaul American energy will soon come before Congress. There will never be a better chance for Joe Biden to show real ambition on climate. If the blackouts in Texas are any guide, it would not just be the world that thanks him, but Americans, too. But the politics of greening America are never easy. What might the new president get done?


We hear from John Kerry, Mr Biden’s climate envoy, Varshini Prakash of Sunrise, a movement of young climate activists who helped get the new president elected, and from West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin, whose vote will be crucial in passing new laws.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Have I not news for you: Facebook’s Australian battle
21 perc 1887. rész

A media code that would obligate tech giants to pay for linking to news stories looks set to pass. In response, Facebook pre-emptively took down those links—and a whole lot more. So-called honour killings persist in the Arab world; we examine the support for such murders and look at attempts to reform lax laws. And remembering the jazz-fusion giant Chick Corea.

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The Economist Asks: Herbert Diess
28 perc 1886. rész

When will the electric car rule the road? Herbert Diess, the chief executive of Germany's Volkswagen Group, talks to Anne McElvoy and Simon Wright, The Economist’s Industry editor, about its plans to switch from the internal-combustion engine to electrification. More than a dozen countries have set a date for when they will prohibit sales of fossil-fuelled cars -- but are these plans realistic? He also tells us why his daughter doesn’t own a car and who he thinks will win the electrification race.


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Watts the problem: Texas’s energy failings
23 perc 1885. rész

Crippling blackouts can be explained in part by the state’s unique energy market, but the disaster exposes wider failures that must be confronted amid a changing climate. Today’s landing of another Mars rover broadens the hunt for evidence of extraterrestrial life—an effort that is expanding faster and farther than ever before. And soft rock shakes off its milquetoast manner.

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Babbage: Hard reboot
25 perc 1884. rész

Intel is the world’s biggest chipmaker. So why is it underperforming—and can its new boss turn the company around? As the search for life on Mars hots up, astrophysicist Avi Loeb argues science has already detected evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial life. And, why parents of daughters are more likely to divorce than those with sons. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial
20 perc 1883. rész

It is not violent young protesters in the dock: the accused are the architects of the territory’s democracy. Our correspondent examines the city’s descent into authoritarian rule. In Colombia, activists are disappearing or being killed at a horrific rate. We ask why, and what can be done. And weighing up Oregon’s daring drug-decriminalisation experiment.

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Money Talks: Return of the wheelie-bag
23 perc 1882. rész

Globetrotting had never been easier—then the pandemic brought it to a standstill. The Economist’s industry editor Simon Wright investigates how mass travel has changed the world and what it will take to get people moving again. Could this shock to the system be an opportunity to make the future of tourism greener, safer and more enjoyable?


With Michael O’Leary, CEO of Ryanair, James Liang, chairman of CTrip and Trip.com, Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, and Brian Pearce, chief economist of the International Air Transport Association.


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Desert stands: France in the Sahel
22 perc 1881. rész

Terror groups and separatists run riot in the sprawling region, and France has had some success in keeping the peace. But how, and when, to draw down its troops? Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the World Trade Organisation’s history-making new leader, has quite the task ahead to rebuild trust in and among the institution’s members. And the worrying shifts in subsea soundscapes. Additional audio courtesy Jana Winderen. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Jab: How well will vaccines work?
40 perc 1880. rész

The race between infections and injections is in its most crucial phase. What life is like on the other side of the pandemic depends on three things: how well vaccines work, whether there are enough and how many people take them.


Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist who has advised President Biden, tells us the world stands at an inflection point. After getting his jab in Jerusalem, our correspondent there says the vision of the future Israel offers other countries is not as rosy as it first seemed. James Fransham from The Economist data team unpicks the vaccination numbers so far. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor, joins them.


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No Capitol punishment: Trump’s acquittal
24 perc 1879. rész

Donald Trump was all but certain to be cleared in his Senate trial, and so it went. But the few Republican votes to convict are telling. What next for the former president? A look into Swiss efforts to track down a missing $230m raises disturbing questions. And why women aren’t getting the laughs as stand-up comedy grows in China.

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Editor’s Picks: February 15th 2021
24 perc 1878. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how to cope with endemic covid-19, the persecution of the Uyghurs (11:40) and the perks and perils of business leaders (16:50)

 

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Checks and Balance: Lacking class
39 perc 1877. rész

Nearly half America’s children are yet to return to the classroom a year after the pandemic began. President Biden says it’s a national emergency, but he has already diluted a pledge to reopen the majority of schools in his first 100 days. Why is getting back to school so hard?


We hear from The Economist’s US policy correspondent Tamara Gilkes Borr and Adam Roberts, our Midwest correspondent.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Exit-stage plight: Brexit’s costs come due
22 perc 1876. rész

Stock-trading is shifting to the continent; businesses are bound up in red tape; border issues are still simmering. There is far more than mere “teething problems” as Britain and Europe adjust to their new relationship. Our correspondent looks at the slippery nature of risk by speaking with wing-suited daredevils. And in Kenya the flower-industry bounce-back is blooming great news.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Christine Lagarde
27 perc 1875. rész

What next for the euro area? Christine Lagarde, the president of the European Central Bank and the former head of the IMF tells The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, why the continent needs more fiscal support in coming years, why she isn't worried about inflation, and why climate change matters for monetary policy. China is already testing a digital currency -- but a virtual euro may not be too far off. And why women make better leaders. 


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The coup is on the other foot: Myanmar
22 perc 1874. rész

A power-grab by the army’s commander, Min Aung Hlaing, is not turning out to be easy: the greatest protest movement in a generation is gathering steam. Debates over trans rights are particularly fraught in criminal-justice systems. We examine the balancing act going on in America. And a historical tour of autocrats’ luxuriant bathrooms reveals there’s a lot to loos. 

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Babbage: Go with your gut
23 perc 1873. rész

The human microbiome consists of trillions of microorganisms like bacteria, viruses and fungi. Scientists are researching how these tiny creatures could be linked to Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and other diseases. Also, how understanding soil microbiomes could help combat climate change. Kenneth Cukier hosts. 


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Like hell out of a bat: SARS-CoV-2’s origin
20 perc 1872. rész

The World Health Organisation unveiled preliminary findings, suggesting the coronavirus probably jumped to humans via an intermediary animal and all but ruling out a laboratory leak. We examine the many remaining questions. Nefarious regimes find it ever easier to reach across borders, subjecting dissidents to repression and surveillance abroad. And why it’s so hard to buy a car in Algeria. 

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Money Talks: Twin peaks
24 perc 1871. rész

As the price of oil rises, so too does the value of the battery metals that could replace it. Host Patrick Lane asks what’s driving these competing bets on the fuels of the future. Plus, the rise of the hairy zombies: why some of the most pandemic-battered shares in USA Inc are confident of an afterlife. And, how remote work is playing havoc with American taxes. 


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Very long covid: the lasting risks to Africa
21 perc 1870. rész

So far it seems the continent has weathered the pandemic well. But current numbers mask a future reckoning that is likely to have dire human and economic costs. We look into the “predatory trading” that in part explains recent, frenzied action in stockmarkets. And a surprising discovery about the plastics that sink to the oceans’ depths. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The art of the done deal: Trump on trial, again
22 perc 1869. rész

The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump will make history, but its outcome is assured. We ask what the proceedings say about the Republican Party. China’s youth are making their own way, even as the Communist regime tries to win greater loyalty from them; we examine the country’s future leaders. And another, overlooked pandemic: that of loneliness at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: February 8th 2021
24 perc 1868. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the real revolution on Wall Street, Africa’s long covid (10:20) and who is to blame for short-termism? (18:40)

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Camera operators
44 perc 1867. rész

Congress is flexing its muscles. The new president needs to pass a bumper stimulus plan. The old one faces trial in the Senate. Stakes are high for both parties, as the leadership vies with fringe members ever more adept at hogging attention. How will the new Congress work?


We speak to Idrees Kahloon, The Economist’s Washington correspondent. Josh Holmes, a former aide to the Republican Senate leader, and Sarah Bryner of the Center for Responsive Politics also join.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Ballot bonanza: Latin America’s year of elections
21 perc 1866. rész

Ecuador’s elections on Sunday kick off a packed year of polls in the region. Democracy’s foothold in South America looks assured; in Central America, less so. Engineers are vastly improving the core technologies in televisions. We preview the viewing pleasure to come. And remembering Nikolai Antoshkin, a Soviet general who faced unknowable danger to save untold lives.

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The Economist Asks: Heather Cox Richardson
28 perc 1865. rész

What does American history tell us about politics now? Anne McElvoy asks the professor at Boston College and author of the popular newsletter "Letters from an American". Using the sweep of history since the civil war, she brings a long view to febrile US politics and explains why she thinks the GOP is like a car driven into a deep ditch. Also her personal connection to the sea shanty—the nautical songs taking over social media.


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Cheques notes: getting America’s stimulus right
21 perc 1863. rész

Congress is on the cusp of pushing through a $1.9trn stimulus bill. But would it be money well spent? We examine the economics. Nearly half of India’s students attend cheap, efficient private schools that have been hit harder by the pandemic than the state-run kind. And the latest bid to clean up Earth’s celestial neighbourhood—and how to finance it.

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Babbage: Clash of the titans
27 perc 1862. rész

As Facebook and Apple go head-to-head over privacy, the impact could be felt across the digital world. We ask Michael Wooldridge, a leading AI researcher, whether artificial intelligence is the answer to the world’s problems, the seed of humanity’s eventual destruction—or neither. And the world would look very different without the LED: we speak to one of the engineers behind this illuminating technology. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Rise above the cloud: Amazon’s new chief executive
20 perc 1861. rész

Jeff Bezos is relinquishing the reins—partly—of the firm he founded. We take a look at Andy Jassy, who will replace him as chief executive at a profitable but tricky time. Our annual Democracy Index isn’t brimming with great news; we examine how democratic norms are faring worldwide. And the capture of the biggest drug lord you’ve probably never heard of. 

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Money Talks: UnStoppable
27 perc 1860. rész

The GameStop saga continues—does it reveal a cheat code to how to beat the stockmarket, or is it a sign of a deeper transformation at work in the financial system? Plus, property is the biggest asset market in the world and nowhere bigger than in China. Host Simon Long asks how long China’s property boom can hold. And, our Buttonwood columnist shares some hard truths about investing in bricks and mortar. 


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As a general rules: Myanmar’s coup
20 perc 1859. rész

The army already had plenty of political power, but following a landslide election loss it dramatically seized more. After five years of democracy, will the country abide a return to military rule? The wind-power boom has driven a scramble for balsa wood—harming the Ecuadoreans who live where it grows. And a better way to test the language skills of would-be citizens. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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More needles in the haystack: vaccine candidates proliferate
22 perc 1858. rész

That a coronavirus vaccine could be developed in a year is astonishing—and promising candidates just keep coming. How will the virus’s variants change the dynamic? Palestine may at last hold elections, after 15 years of promises. But Mahmoud Abbas, the incumbent president, may end up as the only viable candidate. And the probable first big market for lab-grown meat.

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Editor’s Picks: February 1st 2021
23 perc 1857. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: who will go nuclear next?, new leadership is needed in the West Bank and Gaza (9:45) and can Boeing fly without government help? (15:35) 

 

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Checks and Balance: Sleeves up
42 perc 1856. rész

Around 85% of Americans need to be vaccinated for the country to return to normal. Much rests on how quickly the Biden administration can get shots into the arms of those most at risk from covid-19. Racial equity is a priority for the new president. What are the barriers to faster and fairer vaccine roll-out?


We hear from two doctors administering the vaccines: Martin Stallone of Cayuga Medical Centre and Seiji Hayashi, a family physician in Washington DC. The Economist’s US policy correspondent Tamara Gilkes Borr also contributes.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Tug of warheads: the nuclear order
21 perc 1855. rész

Successful arms-control diplomacy has kept proliferation at bay for decades. But many states now have nuclear ambitions; we look at an increasingly worrying shift. Rapid development in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a “double burden” of malnutrition: obesity is skyrocketing even as undernourishment continues. And the riches and the tensions to be found at a Greenland rare-earth-minerals mine. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: What happened in Wuhan?
27 perc 1854. rész

A year ago the Chinese city of 11 million people cut itself off to contain the spread of a deadly virus. Hao Wu, the director of "76 Days" a documentary about the Wuhan lockdown, talks to Anne McElvoy about the first casualties, life under quarantine and the personal impact of covid-19. Why did Hao Wu avoid politics in the film and why has he been trolled for making it?  Also The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, and Chaguan columnist David Rennie, on how Chinese people's view of democracy has been eroded by the virus.


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Conte’s inferno: political crisis in Italy
20 perc 1853. rész

The president is scrambling to pull together a workable government following Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s resignation—and the instability has big implications for Europe’s post-pandemic plans. We examine the staggering rise of shares in GameStop and the day traders trying to stick it to the hedge-funders. And the sport of back-country skiing gets a lift in America.

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Babbage: Is the model looking good?
24 perc 1852. rész

As initial data arrives from countries with high vaccination rates, how will the covid-19 vaccines affect the prevalence of infections? Epidemiologist Professor Mark Woolhouse explains his models of the future of the virus. Plus: a new way of getting concentrated oxygen out of the air and Britain's state-run strategies for capitalising on the growing space economy. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


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Vials and tribulations: the EU’s vaccine push
19 perc 1851. rész

The European Union’s vaccine rollout was slow and fragmented even before pharma companies warned of supply shortfalls; we ask what’s gone wrong. Australia’s proposed law that would force tech titans to pay news providers is just one front in a battle that might upend a foundational principle of the internet. And the bawdy baked goods that have captured Egyptians’ attention. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: The chips are down
26 perc 1850. rész

The vast semiconductor industry is booming but faces new stresses that recently stalled production lines worldwide and could threaten the stability of the global economy. President Biden’s “Buy American” executive order aims to create jobs and boost resilience—but will Americans actually benefit? And, economist Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a modern “moonshot”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


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Party down: Vietnam’s Communist leaders meet
21 perc 1849. rész

At this week’s five-yearly congress there will be pride in the handling of the pandemic—but broader discontent and mounting protests should worry party bigwigs. We ask our education correspondent why so many American schools remain empty and what the long-run costs will be. And differentiating the difficult character of Patricia Highsmith from the litany of difficult characters she conjured.

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The World Ahead: Lockdown lessons
25 perc 1848. rész

The pandemic has forced universities to move teaching online. Tom Standage asks if attitudes are shifting among students, and academics, towards remote learning. What could this mean for the future of higher education? How would it affect the business models of some universities? And how might online-learning tools evolve in a future, as lifelong learning becomes the new normal?

 

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Vlad tidings: demonstrations across Russia
20 perc 1847. rész

The arrest of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny—and an exposé he released alleging deep corruption—fuelled vast weekend protests, chipping away at President Vladimir Putin’s legitimacy. Having left the European Union Britain must find a new foreign-policy foothold in the world; we examine its options and its moves so far. And a shocking revelation about haggis ahead of Scotland’s Burns Night celebrations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: January 25th 2021
18 perc 1846. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what to expect from a Biden presidency, famine crimes in Ethiopia (8:40) and lessons in listening from a hostage negotiator (13:14).

 

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Checks and Balance: Ctrl Alt Delete
38 perc 1845. rész

Joe Biden faces multiple crises after four years that often resembled a denial-of-service attack on American governance. How will the new administration reboot Washington?

 

Washington residents reflect on an unusual inauguration, we look back to previous presidencies birthed in crises, and speak to Kathryn Dunn Tenpas of the Brookings Institution about repairing the machinery of government.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


The Economist data team tracks Joe Biden’s first 100 days


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Biting the hands that would feed: Ethiopia
18 perc 1844. rész

There are signs that the federal government is obstructing humanitarian aid to the war-torn region of Tigray, putting millions of civilians at risk of famine. We draw lessons from Israel’s vaccine rollout to predict what still lies ahead for many countries. And what can be learned by striking a deal with Bali’s larcenous monkeys. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain
28 perc 1843. rész

Can President Biden revive bipartisanship in America? Anne McElvoy asks the widow of Republican Senator John McCain and member of the Biden-Harris transition advisory council if Joe Biden can achieve his hopes of ‘unity’ in a divided America. After the violence at the Senate on the 6th of January, does the GOP still represent Mrs. McCain’s values and is America constitutionally strong? And, is she the next US ambassador to London? 

 

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Much to repair: Biden’s first day on the job
22 perc 1842. rész

The watchword was unity as Joe Biden took office—he struck a calming tone and got immediately to work. We analyse the gargantuan tasks that lie ahead. Messaging services such as WhatsApp provide a needed online forum; as users flood to new apps we examine questions of privacy and security. And the Parisian street artist depicting brutal protests to unsettling effect.

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Babbage: Photon opportunity
23 perc 1841. rész

How has Albert Einstein’s work on photons ushered in a golden age of light? Oliver Morton, The Economist's briefings editor, explores why the laser's applications have been spectacular and how solar power became the cheapest source of electricity in many countries. Also, he talks to the scientists scanning the skies with the largest digital camera in the world.


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Costly disbelief: covid-19 ravages Brazil again
20 perc 1840. rész

Desperate scenes in the city of Manaus may foretell a dire wave throughout the country. A misguided sense of “herd immunity” has worsened matters, as has the president’s persistent scepticism. We examine history to see how lasers progressed from practical impossibility to utter ubiquity—and the scientific frontiers they are still illuminating. And how clams are protecting lives in Poland. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Biden, it’s time
24 perc 1839. rész

What will the new president’s plans mean for the American economy—and for its partners and rivals around the world? Sabine Weyand, of the European Commission’s department for international trade, explains how the EU hopes to rebalance the global trading order in the post-Trump era. And host Simon Long asks why, despite a return to growth, the Communist Party is busy reining in China Inc.


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Hell no, we won’t grow: Indian farmers’ mass protests
21 perc 1838. rész

Hundreds of thousands of farmers have participated in protests around Delhi, demonstrating against laws that they say threaten their livelihoods. We ask how the standoff will end. Today America will designate Yemen’s Houthi militants as terrorists, but that is likely only to harm a population already facing starvation. And what’s behind a boom in African comics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Landed, in trouble: Alexei Navalny returns to Russia
20 perc 1837. rész

The opposition leader was detained as soon as he arrived—but President Vladimir Putin has no good options for dealing with his most vocal opponent. Germany’s ruling CDU party has a new leader; we examine the challenges that lie ahead for him, his party and his country. And the kerfuffle behind an American-made film relegated to the Golden Globes’ foreign-language category. 

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Editor’s Picks: January 18th 2021
28 perc 1836. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Donald Trump’s reckoning, the new era of innovation (9:20), and Mikhail Gorbachev’s afterlife (16:45). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: On mute
44 perc 1835. rész

In the last week of his presidency Donald Trump is being purged from the political mainstream. Congress has impeached him again. He has been booted off social media. A major golf tournament has been pulled from one of his courses. How should Donald Trump and his followers be held to account for damaging American democracy?


We speak to Elizabeth Neumann, who led the counterterrorism office at the Department of Homeland Security, and Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University who tracks online extremism. The Economist correspondents Steven Mazie and Leo Mirani also join us.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Bold Wine in new battles: Uganda’s election
19 perc 1834. rész

After a violent campaign in which the opposition candidate Bobi Wine was extensively intimidated, authorities imposed an internet blackout. President Yoweri Museveni will almost certainly cling to power—a worry for Uganda and the wider region. Wikipedia turns 20 today; we ask how, against long odds, it has survived and grown. And the video game that’s sparking a moral panic in Afghanistan.

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The Economist Asks: Jimmy Wales
27 perc 1833. rész

As Wikipedia turns 20, we ask its founder Jimmy Wales how “the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit” really works. Also, as creator of another tech giant, does he reckon social media is still a force for good? And were some major platforms right to ban President Trump from communicating on them? He also confides his homeschooling tips.  


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Two-timer: Trump impeached, again
20 perc 1832. rész

Some House Republicans broke ranks, joining Democrats to hand President Donald Trump an ignominious distinction. Our deputy editor lays out why the Senate should now convict and remove him. Under South Africa’s ruling ANC party a powerful black middle class bloomed, but the party’s fiscal mismanagement threatens their loyalty. And the boom in “spirits” with no booze but plenty of branding. 

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Babbage: Innovation’s new wave
27 perc 1831. rész

Covid-19 has catalysed scientific advancement and boosted technological optimism. Could innovation be the answer to decades of slowing growth in Western countries? Also, why magnetic tape still reigns supreme in “cold” data storage. And how effective are traditional herbal remedies at treating tropical diseases? 


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Trial ensnarer: human-rights law’s new tool
20 perc 1830. rész

War criminals and their ilk often evade justice solely because of squabbling over who can be tried where. But a rise in “universal jurisdiction” trials is tightening the net. Recent lockdowns’ hits to global economies are not nearly as deep as they were the first time around; we explore why. And Cambodian rat-catchers reckon with boom and bust. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Testing their metals
25 perc 1829. rész

Despite the economic catastrophe of the pandemic, prices of goods such as copper, iron ore and soya beans are surging; just how far can commodities climb? Also, how the Brexit trade agreement will reshape business on both sides of the Channel. And, the economic cost of covid-19 is impossible to calculate—but host Patrick Lane has a go anyway.


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You don’t say: tech’s Trump bans
22 perc 1828. rész

Moves to shutter the president’s accounts and to crimp corners of the internet given to right-wing extremism raise thorny questions, both about free speech and social-media firms’ business models. Our public-policy editor takes a broad look at girlhood: how women’s adolescence has changed for the better but is challenged mightily by covid-19. And science’s bid to save more snake-bite victims’ lives.

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Wrest wing: the bid to oust Trump
21 perc 1827. rész

Today Democratic lawmakers will begin attempts to remove President Donald Trump. It could fail, or be delayed—or Republicans could see a political opportunity. Even amid a global vaccination drive, the hunt for covid-19 treatments continues; we examine two existing arthritis drugs that appear to save lives. And the synthesiser that conquered music in the 1980s and then stuck around. Additional audio courtesy of Nate Mars and Daniel Reid. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: January 11th 2021
24 perc 1826. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the shame and the opportunity of Trump’s legacy, how to deal with China (8:50), and why the crazy upward march in stock prices might just continue (15:45).

 

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Checks and Balance: American carnage
43 perc 1825. rész

President Trump stood on the Capitol steps at his inauguration and promised to stop “this American carnage.” Four years later a violent mob stormed the Capitol building in an attempt to overturn his election defeat. Will this jarring spectacle make breaking with Mr Trump easier for Republicans? 


We hear from historian Rick Perlstein, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief James Astill and Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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The longer arm of the law: Hong Kong
23 perc 1824. rész

A national-security law imposed by Beijing had not, until this week, bared its teeth; the arrests of dozens of pro-democracy figures reveals how much it can crimp opposition. At the American Economics Association’s annual shindig, a scholar implores economists to recalibrate just how self-interested they take people to be. And the inspiring life and untimely death of a beloved, goat-herding refugee. 

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The Economist Asks: Margaret MacMillan
27 perc 1823. rész

After the shocking scenes in Washington DC this week, we ask war historian Margaret MacMillan if violence is an inevitable part of civilization. Professor MacMillan, author of 'War: How conflict shaped us', reflects on whether the invasion of the Capitol qualifies as a coup. And she unravels the mystery of why we fight, from ancient times to the 21st century. 


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Riot act: Biden confirmed amid chaos
20 perc 1822. rész

After previously unthinkable scenes played out in Washington’s legislature, we ask what the violence will mean for the president, Republican lawmakers and American democracy. Argentina’s move to liberalise its abortion laws reflects slowly changing attitudes across Latin America, and may spur wider change. And examining the history of Ethio-jazz, a unique musical melting pot. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Viral defences
27 perc 1821. rész

A new strain of covid-19 is surging in Britain, America and Europe—vaccines can curb the effects, but can governments speed up the roll-out? Also, in 2020 some regions acted rapidly enough to avoid severe waves of infection. Host Kenneth Cukier speaks to the public health leaders who initiated “elimination” strategies.


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Run-off, their feat: Georgia’s Senate races
22 perc 1820. rész

Democrats look set to win both the run-off elections that will determine control of the Senate—and how President-elect Joe Biden will be able to govern. Quantum computing is still nascent, its power yet to be truly tapped. But the finance sector is already looking to squeeze it for analytical advantage. And how Confucianism still influences society in South Korea.

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Money Talks: Once bitcoin, thrice as high
23 perc 1819. rész

Having tripled in value in the past quarter, the cryptocurrency continues its rollercoaster ride, as the financial establishment begins to jump aboard. Also, why a new EU-China investment deal fails to balance competition, cooperation and confrontation. And, what can companies do to bridge the gap between the workforce of today and the jobs of tomorrow? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 


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Stresses of strains: emerging coronavirus variants
18 perc 1818. rész

It is no surprise that more-transmissible coronavirus variants are cropping up. We ask how worrisome the strains found in Britain and South Africa are. American authorities have lodged a landmark case against Walmart for its role in the country’s worsening opioid crisis—a problem with clearly more than one cause. And dealing with the pile of unused vacation days from 2020.

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Arms within reach: Israel's vaccination lead
23 perc 1817. rész

Aggressive purchasing, solid logistics and a competitive health-care system have led to a world-beating rate of immunisation—but, as ever, politics is playing a role, too. Big oil had a terrible 2020, but the sector’s troubles pre-date the pandemic; we look at the supermajors’ varying approaches to an uncertain future. And how covid-19 is reshaping China’s clubbing scene.

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The Jab: Trailer
1 perc 1817. rész

In this new weekly podcast series, The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen.


Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. 

 

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Editor’s Picks: January 4th 2021
21 perc 1816. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Britain’s place in the world, the future of global e-commerce (9:25), and using urine to heat homes (16:30).

 

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Checks and Balance: Leaving today
43 perc 1815. rész

New York became the epicentre of the pandemic when it first hit America. More than 25,000 New Yorkers have died of covid-19. An estimated 300,000 have left the city as its health infrastructure stretched beyond capacity, schools closed, and crime spiked. The loss of commuters and tourists leaves a huge hole in the city's finances. But the city has bounced back from bankruptcy, and worse, before. Can it recover in 2021?


We speak to funeral director Sal Farenga and Kelley Cabrera, a nurse in The Bronx. Kathryn Wylde of The Partnership for New York City tells us recovery is not guaranteed.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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Babbage: Baby it’s cold outside
25 perc 1814. rész

In a special holiday episode, we travel to the Russian Arctic to meet the "prophet of the permafrost", take an extraterrestrial hike in the tracks of NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars and meet the researchers cataloguing culture. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Isle talk to EU later: a vote on a scant Brexit deal
20 perc 1813. rész

Britain’s parliament will vote today on its last-gasp agreement with the European Union. But that will only mark the start of more negotiations for years to come. And we examine the shortlist from The Economist’s annual “country of the year” debate—New Zealand, Malawi and Taiwan—and unveil the winner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: The Alexander technique
24 perc 1812. rész

A hundred years ago, Sadie Alexander became the first African American to receive a PhD in economics and then spent a career fighting racial discrimination. In this episode, The Economist’s trade and globalisation editor Soumaya Keynes speaks to Nina Banks of Bucknell University about rediscovering Alexander's economics and why her insights are still relevant today. 

 

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Cheques, imbalances: America’s fraught stimulus
22 perc 1811. rész

After months of deadlock, a covid-19 relief package has passed, but the battles continue. We ask how things got so dire and what President-elect Joe Biden will inherit. A deadly shootout in London more than a century ago still resonates today; we examine one of the world’s first breaking-news stories. And the colour black reaches new depths in art. 

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The World Ahead: Joe Biden’s in-tray
23 perc 1810. rész

Looking ahead to 2021, we consider Joe Biden’s domestic-policy agenda: faced with a pandemic and an economic crisis, where will he start? To what extent will the new president be able to heal America’s deep cultural divides and how will state-level politics influence his policies? Also, how will the Republican party evolve in 2021? Tom Standage hosts.

 

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Going around the bloc: Europe’s vaccination push
22 perc 1809. rész

The first inoculations are happening across the continent as part of a co-ordinated push—but levels of both supply and uptake remain uncertain. Our correspondent explores South Korea’s obsession with hiking and why it means different things to different climbers. And looking back on a troubling year for Britain’s royals.

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Editor’s Picks: December 28th 2020
55 perc 1808. rész

A selection of three articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week: a history of Christmas newsletters, the life of Desiderius Erasmus (18:20) and the lure of pebbles (37:45).


 

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The Economist Asks: Misty Copeland
27 perc 1807. rész

Was the first black principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre earlier denied roles because of her skin colour? She tells host, Anne McElvoy, how dance saved her from a difficult childhood and about her first performance in a classic Christmas production. And, which ballets would she remove from the repertoire?


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Babbage: The parasites and the pandemic
30 perc 1806. rész

While the world has been preoccupied with tackling covid-19, deadly malaria epidemics are continuing around the world. Robert Guest, The Economist’s foreign editor, investigates how covid-19 has affected the fight against malaria and talks to scientists in Senegal working to eliminate the disease. Also, historian Timothy Winegard explains how malaria has shaped life on Earth.


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Old acquaintance not forgot: the notable deaths of 2020
22 perc 1805. rész

In a year marked by more than a million and a half deaths, mortality has rarely been so front of mind. Our obituary editor looks back through the notable figures she has memorialised, from George Floyd to Vera Lynn. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Merry Talks: The year that was
30 perc 1804. rész

Tins of tuna and bedroom slippers, triple-digit growth and IPO implosion—what could it all mean? Host Henry Tricks leads an international band of “Money Talks” regulars on a whistlestop tour through a year like no other. The team choose their stories of the year, face baffling clues to mystery items, and share their predictions—and their hopes—for 2021.


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Bubbles in the market: Mexico’s Coca-Cola obsession
21 perc 1803. rész

For decades, the country has been an almighty consumer of the fizzy drink. But amid a woeful covid-19 situation politicians are highlighting the health concerns it brings. In getting to know a sleepy French village, our correspondent finds a nuanced view of isolation in the pandemic age. And the lavish books providing a never-before-seen perspective on the Sistine Chapel’s frescoes.

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Get the lead out: Zambia’s toxic mine
22 perc 1802. rész

A site that closed more than a quarter-century ago is still slowly poisoning the residents of Kabwe with lead; a class-action lawsuit is at last seeking redress. Our correspondent visits the ancient monastery behind the international Shaolin brand, learning the subtle story of its abbot and chief executive. And flicking through The Economist’s staff picks for books of the year.

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Editor’s Picks: December 21st 2020
20 perc 1801. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: reflecting on the plague year, ten years after the Arab spring (9:50), and what if CEOs’ memos were clear and honest? (15:30).

 

 

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Checks and Balance: The unfinished revolution
37 perc 1800. rész

After the defeat of the Confederacy and the end of slavery in 1865, the period known as Reconstruction was a chance to create a multiracial democracy and for America to live up to the promise made at its founding. It ended in failure. But in establishing the idea that the federal government should act as a guarantor of individual liberties it planted the seeds of that democracy. America’s second revolution remains unfinished.


Our end-of-year special episode asks what the history of Reconstruction reveals about 2020’s reckoning on race. 


We talk to Eric Foner, the leading historian of Reconstruction, Kimberlé Crenshaw of the African American Policy Forum, and Aderson Francois, a Georgetown law professor.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Rehousing project: Bangladesh’s Rohingya
21 perc 1799. rész

The country’s refugee camps are packed and squalid, so the government is moving perhaps 100,000 Rohingya Muslims to a tiny island. Will life for them improve? Military tactics can be misleading; sometimes they are outright trickery. Our defence editor looks at the past and future of military deception. And why Christmas dinner involves such different fare around the world.

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The Economist Asks: What next for Germany after Merkel?
26 perc 1798. rész

Anne McElvoy asks the former German ambassador to the US, Wolfgang Ischinger, if America can still be relied upon as a “protective uncle” and how it should deal with China. And, who will succeed Chancellor Merkel in 2021? Anne talks to German cabinet minister Jens Spahn, one of a proposed 'dream team' of candidates in the upcoming party leadership contest. 


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And then, winter: ten years after the Arab Spring
23 perc 1797. rész

A revolutionary conflagration a decade ago has almost entirely flickered out. We ask what happened to all the optimism and why real change has been so hard to achieve. A widely watched lawsuit reveals the slow march of feminism in China, one case at a time. And a look back at Ludwig van Beethoven’s life and work, 250 years on. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Taming the tech titans
26 perc 1796. rész

This week the EU unveiled its plan to rein in big tech—the draft laws target the American giants, but European firms may not benefit much. Also, how a failed study has revealed a promising new gene-therapy treatment for blindness. And, which science stories were overlooked in a year dominated by covid-19? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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This market went a little piggy: a capital-raising frenzy
22 perc 1795. rész

Astonishingly, companies have raised more capital this year than ever before. We ask how capital markets shook free amid the pandemic—and what will happen with all that cash now. Our correspondent finds just how dependent the world’s waste-management industry is on informal workers, whose hard jobs have been made far harder this year. And the technology making megaphones much more mega.

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Money Talks: The madness of crowds
28 perc 1794. rész

A volatile world begets volatile financial markets. Does this explain investor enthusiasm for tech stocks and IPOs—or is something else afoot? Also, Michael O’Leary, the boss of Europe’s largest airline Ryanair, reads the skies ahead. And, the little-known history of working from home: even in the 18th and 19th centuries it had its advantages. Patrick Lane hosts 


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Joe, College: Biden’s victory affirmed
21 perc 1793. rész

America’s by-the-book electoral-college vote calmed concerns about another Trump-camp bid to overturn the election—but that is not to say the ructions are over. On an unannounced visit to a suspected forced-labour camp in China’s Xinjiang province, our correspondent runs into trouble when witnessing evidence of a far wider social-engineering effort. And Cuba’s beloved sweet, milky treat gets a freshen-up. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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So long, and we’re keeping all the fish: Brexit
18 perc 1792. rész

Britain’s divorce from the European Union still hinges on sticky matters of fishing rights and the enforcement of fair competition, and time is rapidly running out to strike a deal. India’s fantastical “love jihadconspiracy theory is just another Muslim-marginalisation move—one that the government seemingly approves of. And a hermit-crab housing shortage in Thailand.

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Editor’s Picks: December 14th 2020
20 perc 1791. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: after the pandemic, will inflation return? Religious discrimination in a New York village (09:35). And, the global repercussions of an English ruling on transgender teens (13:45)

 

 

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Checks and Balance: On my mind
38 perc 1790. rész

As 2020 draws to a close, the partisan feud is focused on Georgia. Joe Biden was the first Democrat in 28 years to win the state on the way to the White House. Run-off elections on January 5th will decide who controls the Senate - and Biden’s agenda. They will also test Donald Trump’s hold on his party as he refuses to admit defeat. Will Georgia tip the balance of American politics?


Pablo Montagnes of Emory University lays out Georgia’s political geography, Congresswoman-elect Nikema Williams and State Senator Jen Jordan account for the Democrats’ success, and Congressman Tom Graves assesses Republican fortunes. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Taking the temperature: a climate chat with the UN chief
20 perc 1789. rész

Ahead of a weekend meeting to assess and bolster the Paris Agreement, our correspondent speaks with Antonio Guterres about his reasons for cautious optimism. The founder of an upstart far-right Dutch party has been consumed by scandals; we discuss a disastrous downfall. And following AirBnB’s stonking stockmarket debut, we examine the revealed preferences of pandemic-era bookers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Joseph Henrich
28 perc 1788. rész

How stable is the West? Professor Joseph Henrich, chair of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, says that even successful societies can implode. He tells Anne McElvoy that the economically dominant Western identity, evolving from the “psychologically peculiar” minds of the population, could look very different in the future. 


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If you already joined ‘em, beat ‘em: Facebook gets sued
21 perc 1787. rész

American regulators have put mergers that they approved years ago at the heart of antitrust lawsuits—a tricky bid to curb the social-media giant’s market power. We examine the surge of an artist-led protest movement in Cuba, where dissent on any scale is a dangerous proposition. And what a cross-border, ski-slope spat reveals about European co-operation. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Lighter than air
23 perc 1786. rész

The aviation industry is under pressure to curb carbon-dioxide emissions—hydrogen fuel could offer a greener way to fly. Also, host Kenneth Cukier unravels the inner workings of the human mind with psychologist Howard Gardner and neuroscientist David Eagleman. If there are multiple intelligences, what happens when they work together? And, how technology can tap into the abilities of the ever-changing brain.


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Laïcité, égalité, fraternité? France’s secularism bill
19 perc 1785. rész

President Emmanuel Macron’s draft bill walks a fine line balancing the country’s foundational secularism and worries about Islamist terrorism. Amid slumping economies everywhere, Taiwan’s looks surprisingly buoyant; we ask how that might continue after the pandemic. And how managers can best navigate the holiday-party season in a cheerless year.

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Money Talks: Will inflation bounce back?
24 perc 1784. rész

Worrying about inflation has gone out of style. But a small band of economists and investors argue the pandemic could usher in a new era of rising prices. Also, how one of the world’s biggest pension funds is navigating this and other pandemic-related risks. And, the remarkable resilience of America’s chain restaurants. Simon Long hosts


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Granting immunity: America weighs vaccine approval
21 perc 1783. rész

As Britons receive the first doses of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine, authorities in America are meeting this week to authorise its emergency use. We examine the approaches on both sides of the pond. Despite pandemic prescriptions of social distancing, multigenerational living is on the rise. And how Advent calendars became so very extra.

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Fairly unusual: Ghana’s elections
22 perc 1782. rész

In a region racked by dodgy polls, the country looks to continue a trend of uncontested handovers of power. That is not to say, however, that there aren’t sticking points. As tortuous Brexit negotiations drag on, we look at how British farming can and should change under a new regulatory regime. And the starving deer of a Japanese tourist hotspot.

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Editor’s Picks: December 7th 2020
24 perc 1781. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: killing coal, Joe Biden and Iran (10:30), and how Taiwan’s economy remains resilient (16:20) 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Using my religion
41 perc 1780. rész

A ruling lifting covid restrictions on places of worship suggests the Supreme Court will favour religious rights even as faithlessness is rising. The court’s realignment may be Donald Trump’s most enduring legacy. How is the balance between religion and politics shifting in America?


David French of The Dispatch explains how secularisation lays a religious rift onto the political one, we find out why the French president is carping at America over secularism, and how Joe Biden will navigate this tricky territory.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Intensive scare: covid-19 ravages America
23 perc 1779. rész

Numbers of cases, hospitalisations and deaths are rocketing across the country. We examine the situation in the Midwest, as a microcosm of a wider unfolding tragedy. Venezuela’s ruling party will take over the National Assembly after Sunday’s vote, sidelining the self-proclaimed legitimate leader Juan Guaidó and cementing Nicolás Maduro’s dictatorship. And the fruitful life and ignominious death of the Arecibo telescope.

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The Economist Asks: Viggo Mortensen
26 perc 1778. rész

The actor, best known for playing Aragorn in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, talks about directing his first feature film on caring for his parents who suffered from dementia. Anne McElvoy asks him why he prefers cinema to home-streaming and whether he believes people will return to the big screen after the pandemic. And, how controversy around Hollywood director Woody Allen doesn’t stop Mortensen from enjoying his films. 

 

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Your planet, or mines? Kicking the coal habit
21 perc 1777. rész

In the West market forces are squeezing coal—even as its use rises in Asia. We examine how the world can wean itself off the dirtiest fossil fuel. Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, Belarus’s probable presidential-election winner, never expected to run for office. Our correspondent visits her in exile, asking about the country’s prospects for democracy. And how candy-floss machines may help make better face masks.

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Babbage: Testing testing
30 perc 1776. rész

Britain has become the first country to license a fully tested covid-19 vaccine—the Economist’s health policy editor explains why this a historic milestone. Until vaccines become widespread, mass testing can be used to curb contagion. And, is it possible to detect covid-19 from the sound of a cough? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Trans formative: a landmark children’s-rights ruling
21 perc 1775. rész

Britain’s High Court has ruled that puberty blockers for children with gender dysphoria have been dispensed too readily, fuelling a debate that will be keenly watched abroad. A vote today on a law tightening accounting rules on American-listed Chinese companies has a political dimension—and implications for investors. And Poland’s populist leaders seize on the resurgence of “disco polo” music.

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Money Talks: Joe’s dream team
24 perc 1774. rész

Mr Biden’s latest nominations for his economic team send a clear message about his gameplan. Plus, deal season returns. Salesforce is eyeing up Slack—united, could the pair take on Microsoft? And, the publishing giant building a behemoth of books. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


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Nuclear-war head: assassination in Iran
19 perc 1773. rész

The killing of the country’s top nuclear scientist comes at a tricky time: violent retribution may threaten hoped-for diplomacy with the incoming American administration. An artificial-intelligence breakthrough may transform protein science, with implications for everything from industrial processes to tackling disease. And why Europe’s lighter-touch, second round of lockdowns have been so effective.

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The World Ahead: Post-coronanomics
22 perc 1772. rész

What is the outlook for the world economy in 2021, and how much lasting damage has been done in 2020? Carmen Reinhart, chief economist at the World Bank, explains how this crisis compares with previous ones. We find out how China’s rapid rebound is taking it back to the future. And, we predict the impact of Joe Biden’s policies on US-China trade relations. Tom Standage hosts.

 

 

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Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)

 

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No show of force: France’s controversial police-protection bill
21 perc 1771. rész

Protesters are raging against a proposed bill that would outlaw posting videos of alleged police brutality—just as two videos expose more such violence. High-stakes exams for students have been delayed, modified, even cancelled during the pandemic; we look at how all those varying results stack up. And, South Africa’s growing trend of livestock theft—and rebranding.  

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Editor’s Picks: November 30th 2020
23 perc 1770. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how resilient is democracy? Nordic politics (11:00) and remembering Diego Maradona (19:34)

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Sedate expectations
44 perc 1769. rész

Policymaker, father figure and stand-in king - the Olympian job description sets an impossible standard for any new president. But expectations of Joe Biden are more modest than for most. Solid picks for the top spots in his administration only confirm his ordinariness. What makes an ideal president and how might Biden match up?


James Astill, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief, assesses how Barack Obama dealt with high expectations, columnist Lane Greene argues Biden’s plain speech is his secret weapon, and writer and producer Michael Oates Palmer tells us what makes a great president on screen.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


1843 Magazine profiles ex-presidents


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One party to rule them all? India’s fraying democracy
20 perc 1768. rész

Many of the country’s institutions are being slowly hobbled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government; we ask whether the world’s largest democracy is in peril. Sweden has a surprisingly entrenched problem with gang violence, revealing the social costs of its segregated populations. And how Black Friday is playing out in the pandemic era. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Nigella Lawson
29 perc 1767. rész

The British chef, author and host of television show “Cook, Eat, Repeat”, tells Anne McElvoy how to become a better cook. They talk about how our relationship with food is changing in the pandemic. Nigella explains the therapeutic nature of cooking and her culinary relationship with her mother. Also, what would she prepare for the new President Biden and her best Thanksgiving recipes—"apple pie without cheese, is like a kiss without a squeeze".


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At his majesty, displeasure: Thailand’s anti-monarchy push
23 perc 1766. rész

A long string of pro-democracy protests are railing more and more against the king himself—and the protesters are younger and more fearless than ever before. The arrest of Bobi Wine, Uganda’s popular singer-turned-opposition-hero, has sparked deadly violence. He won’t win January’s election, but his movement isn’t going away. And a Thanksgiving Day look at the globe-trotting history of the turkey

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Babbage: Another dose of good news
30 perc 1765. rész

Following promising results from Pfizer and Moderna, why is a third vaccine, from Oxford University and AstraZeneca, so important in the fight against covid-19? Host Kenneth Cukier and The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder investigate the different approaches to this immense challenge. And Nicholas Christakis, a doctor and network scientist at Yale University, explains how despite a vaccine the pandemic could change humanity for good.


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Tigray area: Ethiopia’s deadly standoff
21 perc 1764. rész

The northern region’s surrounded forces are ignoring Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s deadline to disarm. More regions are being drawn in—and a conflagration across the Horn of Africa looms. Artificial-intelligence pilots have shown serious dogfighting skills, but for reasons both technical and ethical humans are still needed in the cockpit. And the rise of mixed martial arts on both sides of the Atlantic.

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Money Talks: The money doctors
31 perc 1763. rész

A quiet revolution is happening in asset management. Host Patrick Lane and John O’Sullivan, The Economist’s markets columnist, speak to industry insiders about a centuries-old model under strain. They ask about the cost of the race to zero fees, if value investing has had its day and whether the quest for higher returns will lead to China.


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What funds we’ll have: green venture capital
22 perc 1762. rész

The boom-and-bust of environmental-technology investing has settled out, and money is flooding in—both individual and institutional. We examine the green fields that lie ahead. Many Arab countries have long been suffering an exodus of medical professionals—a problem only magnified by the pandemic. And a reflection on the life of Jonathan Sacks, a tirelessly unifying British rabbi. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


 

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Playing his Trump cards: Biden’s China policy
22 perc 1761. rész

The tone of America’s president-elect on China changed markedly through the campaign; his policies, at least at the outset, may differ little from those of his predecessor. We examine the stark racial disparities in covid-19 outcomes around the world. And the clever use of a waste product to make a better takeaway coffee cup.

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Editor’s Picks: November 23rd 2020
20 perc 1760. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, remaking the British state, the China strategy America needs (08:27) and consultants of swing (14:56)



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Checks and Balance: Not going gentle
40 perc 1759. rész

Donald Trump’s long-held aversion to admitting defeat leaves America with an unprecedented scenario: an incumbent president thwarting the transition to a new administration. How harmful is Donald Trump’s refusal to concede?


In this episode we find out how a presidential transition is meant to work, how the current upheaval falls short, and how Richard Nixon dealt with a disputed election. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Undercut a deal: the threat to Afghan peace
20 perc 1758. rész

Peace talks continue in Doha but on the ground the Taliban are consolidating control. America’s rush to withdraw its forces could undo the good work of getting them to the negotiating table. As DoorDash heads to a public listing, we look at the rapidly shifting fortunes of the food-delivery business. And why golf has a long-shot problem.

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The Economist Asks: Sonia Friedman
27 perc 1757. rész

The West End and Broadway producer says visiting closed theatres during the lockdown brought her to tears. Now that an effective vaccine is on the horizon, Anne McElvoy asks Friedman what it will take for theatre curtains to rise again. And, after the pandemic how much does it cost to restart a hit show like Harry Potter and the Cursed Child? 


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Quit it cold, Turkey: policy tightens at last
21 perc 1756. rész

Now that the economic reins have been taken back from the president’s son-in-law, the country is making the right policy noises—and just in time. China’s anti-poverty drive is not disinterested charity; it is about transforming citizens’ thoughts. And chronicling Pepe the Frog’s descent into alt-right memedom.

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Babbage: A grand bargain for tech
22 perc 1755. rész

Is it time for a new, global politics of technology? Democratic countries need to establish a robust alternative to China’s autocratic technosphere. The news about potential covid-19 vaccines keeps getting better; we assess how the leading candidates differ. And, is there really phosphine on Venus? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Concession stand: Trump’s intransigence
21 perc 1754. rész

America’s outgoing president is sticking with an insidious fiction, lashing out at those who deny it. That frustrates a stable handover of power—and will cost lives. Egypt has a long-standing problem with sexual harassment and abuse. A reckoning has begun this year, revealing some deeply conservative views among both men and women. And why streaming-era television programmes have got so long.

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Money Talks: Lukewarm RCEPtion
25 perc 1753. rész

China is in, America and India are out; is the world’s biggest trade agreement a triumph for rules-based trade or a step towards a new world order? Donald Trump’s last nominations to the Federal Reserve could help secure his legacy—and limit Mr Biden’s ability to fix the country’s economic problems. And, the candy-pink Swedish unicorn hoping to work its magic in America. Patrick Lane hosts 


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Out on a LegCo: Hong Kong under pressure
22 perc 1752. rész

Following a purge based on a harsh new security law, the territory’s Legislative Council lacks a single opposition voice. That will make the work of pro-Beijing lawmakers easier. As promising vaccines start to emerge, we examine the role of so-called T-cells in granting long-lasting immunity to the coronavirus. And why employers are relying more and more on psychometric tests.

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Disrupter, disrupted: Britain’s government
21 perc 1751. rész

The chief aide to the prime minister had been a driving force in policy but a dividing force in government. What will happen now that he has stood down? We examine how Canada’s response to the pandemic has shielded its economy—so far. And lockdowns bring the market for pasta to a rolling boil. 

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Editor’s Picks: November 16th 2020
21 perc 1750. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Suddenly, hope: covid-19 vaccines, The world and Joe Biden: Great Expectations (09:25) And, how Princess Diana shaped British politics (14:05).

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Opening shot
38 perc 1749. rész

Joe Biden’s first move as president-elect was to unveil a pandemic advisory panel staffed by the public-health experts the incumbent likes to mock. News of an effective covid-19 vaccine came the day America passed 10m recorded cases. What difference will the Biden administration make?


In this episode we hear from Kavita Patel, a doctor who advised Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris, and find out how making a miracle vaccine went wrong once before. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


The Economist charts White House pets 


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Going to cede: Armenia and Azerbaijan
22 perc 1748. rész

The longest-running conflict in the Caucasus could well be over. We examine a peace deal that benefits outside powers and chips away at regional identities. The hipster aesthetic long ago permeated rich countries; our correspondent finds it creeping even into impoverished and war-torn corners of the world. And reflecting on the life of James Randi, a tireless debunker of charlatans.

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The Economist Asks: Jim Clyburn
29 perc 1747. rész

Nicknamed “the kingmaker”, the South Carolina congressman and civil-rights activist set Joe Biden on his path to the White House. But the narrowness of Mr Biden's victory shook Democratic confidence. Anne McElvoy asks one of the most senior Democrats in Congress whether the president-elect can heal America. Did slogans like “defund the police” cost the party at the polls? And, are politicians getting too old?


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Sahel of a mess: France’s impossible peacekeeping mission
23 perc 1746. rész

Jihadism is growing in a continent-wide strip of Africa, and the riskiest operations to contain it fall to French troops. Our correspondent witnesses a fraught and seemingly endless mission. Peru has ousted yet another president, at a woeful time: the pandemic is raging, the economy cratering and politics fracturing. And the movement to water down Sweden’s state monopoly on booze. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: In it for the long-haulers
29 perc 1745. rész

The arrival of vaccines to tame covid-19 now seems within reach, but the disease will continue to shape lives long after the pandemic. The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder speaks to patients, doctors and researchers about the symptoms that make up “long covid”, the latest findings about its causes - and how to treat it.


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We’ll again have Paris: Biden’s ambitious climate plans
21 perc 1744. rész

President-elect Joe Biden’s campaign had the environment front and centre. We analyse his pledges—and his prospects for implementing them. As the video-gaming industry releases its next round of consoles, it is eyeing a far larger prize: high-end gaming with no console at all. And the red poppy of Remembrance Day turns into something of an armistice race in Britain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: The inheritance of Joe
23 perc 1743. rész

Coaxing the American economy back to health will be an unenviable challenge for the 46th president. From taxes to tariffs, we assess the task. And, as Ant agonises, what does the fate of the world’s biggest suspended IPO reveal about the future of private enterprise in China? Simon Long hosts 


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Nine out of ten, doctors say: a promising coronavirus vaccine
20 perc 1742. rész

A vaccine claimed to be 90% effective represents an enormous achievement. We discuss what questions remain and the regulatory and distribution challenges ahead. A string of recent African elections reveals strongmen bending democracy to stay in office; will upcoming polls break it altogether? And a moral crusade in India doesn’t fit the country’s chill relationship with weed. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Brought to heal: Biden’s chance to unite America
22 perc 1741. rész

President Donald Trump will go, but Trumpism will remain. Our editor-in-chief considers how President-elect Biden can repair the divided country he will inherit. Denmark aims to cull 17m mink that could represent a reservoir of a mutated coronavirus—why didn’t it do so when other countries did? And the old-timey Korean music that might just challenge K-pop.  

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Editor’s Picks: November 9th 2020
26 perc 1740. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what the 2020 results say about America’s future, is there an alternative to Huawei’s 5g technology? (09:25) And, global hipster culture is spreading to even the world’s poorest countries (14:15). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: When I’m 46
45 perc 1739. rész

Joe Biden is set to score a rare victory against an incumbent to become America’s 46th president. A Biden White House will set a new tone for the country. Yet the unexpected closeness of the vote - and the president’s refusal to go quietly - means the Trump brand of populism will live on. 


In this episode we decode the message the voters sent and what it means for America with The Economist’s data journalist Elliott Morris and Beijing bureau chief David Rennie.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Abiy damned: Ethiopia’s looming civil war
21 perc 1738. rész

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has taken drastic steps to quieten a state stacked with trained militias. The conflict could draw in more states—or the whole of the Horn of Africa. China’s increasing push for self-reliance in a globalised economy has its complications—made clear by a vast influx of precision-bred super-chickens. And the macabre tale of books bound with human skin.

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The Economist Asks: The Lincoln Project
32 perc 1737. rész

President Trump is on course to lose his re-election bid albeit with the second-highest number of votes ever recorded. Anne McElvoy asks Jennifer Horn, founder of the Lincoln Project, a conservative coalition that campaigned against the president, why Trumpism proved so attractive to swathes of America. Beyond the presidency, which forces are the winners and losers of this election? And, The Economist's deputy editor Edward Carr on what record turnout but contested results say about American democracy.


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The lawyers of diminishing returns: America’s election
20 perc 1736. rész

As President Donald Trump’s re-election path slims, his pledges to fight the results in court are multiplying. We look at the cases that may eventually decide the election. Global crises tend to affect birth rates, and covid-19 is no different—but the effects are not evenly spread. And a suite alternative for business types tired of working from home. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Signal and noise
25 perc 1735. rész

Social media platforms face one of the most testing weeks in their history as they try to filter the real election news from the fake—host Kenneth Cukier asks whether they are up to the task. In the data economy, does privacy equal power? And, how to harness the sound of the deep sea to power underwater devices.


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Tally forth: America’s elections
21 perc 1734. rész

The outcome remains unclear as vote-counting continues. We look at some of the surprise results, ask what happens next and examine how The Economist’s election forecast has held up. And we tag along with our American correspondents for the thrill of election-night reporting.The latest results are here www.economist.com/us2020results; for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Buried in treasuries
24 perc 1733. rész

On election day in the United States, host Patrick Lane looks at perhaps the world’s most important asset market: American government bonds. As it grows, this supposed safe haven is malfunctioning. If Joe Biden wins the presidency, his choice of treasury secretary will reveal much about his priorities—we size up the frontrunners. And, how to count the cost of partisanship to America Inc.


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Poles’ position: an abortion-law backlash
21 perc 1732. rész

Poland already had some of the strictest laws on terminations, but the ruling party’s bid to tighten them further has sparked national outrage. We lay out what to expect on election night in America—the denouement will not be simple, and is unlikely to be quick. And a historical look at the films screened in the White House’s private cinema. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Lock step: England to shut down, again
20 perc 1731. rész

Prime Minister Boris Johnson all but ruled out a second lockdown, but his hand has been forced by England’s caseload. What are the political costs of his U-turn? Myanmar’s coming election will almost certainly be marred by disinformation on Facebook—principally because so many Burmese people get their only news there. And examining the current glut of political biographies.

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Editor’s Picks: November 2nd 2020
27 perc 1730. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why it has to be Joe, green innovation (14:35) and the fight against Mexico’s Coca-Cola habit (20:10). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts.

 

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Checks and Balance: Not so great
46 perc 1729. rész

President Trump’s effect on domestic policy in his first term has been modest and mostly reversible. The real impact of his blow-it-up style has been felt in the corrosion of an already poisonous political culture. How has his brand of anti-politics changed America? 


Trump supporters at one of his last rallies before election day and his former press secretary Sean Spicer tell us why he deserves re-election. Lilliana Mason of the University of Maryland explains how partisanship has become radicalised.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Net losses: plunder of the oceans
21 perc 1728. rész

The staggering extent of illegal fishing, and its human and environmental costs, are only just becoming clear. We ask how to put a shadowy industry on a more even keel. The old guard likes to mock millennial investors, but they’re changing finance, possibly for the better. And as Berlin’s shiny new airport opens we ask: why is it nine years late? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: John Bolton
30 perc 1727. rész

Whether Trump wins or loses the election, what next for the Republicans? The President’s former national security adviser lays out his vision of a Reagan-style future party, where Donald Trump is “a crazy uncle tweeting from the basement”. Also, what advice would Mr Bolton give a newly elected Joe Biden, who he calls “a man of character”. 

 

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What Xi said: China’s five-year plan
21 perc 1726. rész

The party’s fifth plenum sets out a five-year vision; we mine the plan for clues about how China views itself in the world—and how long Xi Jinping intends to lead. The pandemic has the rich world thinking and talking about death in a way not seen since the second world war. And an uncertain future for Singapore’s famed street-food hawkers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Life, the universe and everything
27 perc 1725. rész

From precious moonwater to a handful of asteroid that could provide clues to the origins of life, recent discoveries in our solar system lead host Alok Jha to investigate fundamental questions about the universe. How did life on Earth begin? Could earthly evolution provide a guide to what life elsewhere might be like? And what about the end of everything—the death of the universe itself?


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Stumbling bloc: Europe’s second wave
19 perc 1724. rész

Across the continent, covid-19 cases are rising steeply and containment measures are still divergent. We look at the challenges of finding policies that are efficacious and sustainable. Tanzania’s election today is all but zipped up; President John Magufuli has been trampling the country’s hard-won democratic traditions. And what the florid language of wine experts says about human perception.

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Money Talks: The great divergence
24 perc 1723. rész

As the covid-19 pandemic continues, disparities in the prospects of economies, industries and businesses are increasing. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and Henry Curr, our economics editor, investigate how the pandemic will recast the global economic order. They talk to Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the IMF, to identify who risks being left behind. And as the pandemic upends labour markets, will governments resist change or embrace the new reality?


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Chagrin, and Barrett: America’s Supreme Court
22 perc 1722. rész

Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation marks the first time since the 1930s the court has leaned so conservative, and has stoked another partisan battle that may further reshape the court. Following the announcement of water on the Moon, we look at a looming, broader battle: who will own the water rights? And why Australia’s aboriginal flag is flying less and less. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The World Ahead: A shot in the arm
22 perc 1721. rész

What are the prospects for coronavirus vaccines and the challenges involved in rolling them out around the world in 2021? The Economist's health policy editor explains what regulatory and logistical obstacles must be overcome as vaccines move from the laboratory to the clinic. And the CEO of Gavi, the vaccine alliance, explores how political and economic factors will govern vaccine distribution. Tom Standage hosts.

 

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Coming write-up: Chile votes to overhaul its constitution
21 perc 1720. rész

The country has roundly rejected its dictatorship-era charter and mapped out how to fashion a new one. What do Chileans stand to gain—and to lose? Rising populations of the elderly in the world’s prisons are creating deepening problems, both for jailers and the jailed. And we explore a theory that blames political chaos on too many would-be elites.

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Editor’s Picks: October 26th 2020
23 perc 1719. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how to deal with free speech on social media, a “no deal” Brexit can be avoided (10:05), and is a blue wave on the way? (15:52) 

 

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Checks and Balance: What Don’s done
42 perc 1718. rész

“Promises made, promises kept” is one of President Trump’s campaign slogans. His main achievements on tax, deregulation, or appointing new judges would be hallmarks of any Republican administration. How has Donald Trump changed the country in ways no other president would have? What will linger even if he loses?  


Adam Roberts, The Economist’s Midwest correspondent, looks at the president’s record on immigration. Trade and globalisation editor Soumaya Keynes tells us how effective Trump’s trade policy has been. And healthcare correspondent Slavea Chankova assesses his response to covid-19. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


1843 Magazine: Movie Night at the White House


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Civil proceedings: America's presidential debate
20 perc 1717. rész

America’s final presidential debate had less noise and more substance. But polls seem immovable and nearly 50m Americans have already voted; will the race change? South Korea’s population-boosting efforts have failed, so it is encouraging more women into the workforce—and that will redress some long-standing inequalities. And crunching 70 years’ worth of Formula 1 data to find the sport’s true greatest. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Brené Brown
30 perc 1716. rész

The Texan research professor, podcaster and adviser to CEOs explains how to preserve mental health in the covid-19 era. Anne McElvoy asks what her study of isolation shows about the effects of pandemic restrictions. Brown explains the effects of fear during lockdowns and how our neurobiology makes us seek a sense of control. She argues the benefits of executives showing their vulnerable side and cautions against the comforting certainties offered by politicians. And, is this a podcast, pausecast or squeezecast?


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Pandemic power-grabs: autocrats’ covid opportunism
20 perc 1715. rész

As it has with so many other trends, the pandemic has hastened the decline of democracy and human rights; covid-19 provides autocrats with perfect cover. The plummeting price for the cobalt that powers electronics has upended lives and driven crime in the Democratic Republic of Congo. And how physicists found an upper bound for the speed of sound. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Herd mentality
28 perc 1714. rész

As new waves of covid-19 sweep around the world, scientists are clashing over the concept of herd immunity. Host Kenneth Cukier asks scientists on both sides of the debate whether covid-19 should be left to spread freely among the young and healthy? Also, the Department of Justice's federal antitrust lawsuit against Google—we search what this means for big tech.


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Secular-stand nation: terror in France
22 perc 1713. rész

The brutal murder of a schoolteacher comes amid warnings of mounting Islamism in the country. The attack will only harden resolve for a secular society. Alexei Navalny, Russia’s opposition leader, speaks with our correspondent about the attempt on his life; it signals, he says, a regime in decline. And data reveal how the arrival of mobile internet erodes faith in governments.

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Money Talks: Xinomics
29 perc 1712. rész

A new economic era is dawning in China—a potent mix of autocracy, technology and dynamism. Our Asia economics editor Simon Rabinovitch and host Simon Long speak to local business owners and economists about this evolution of state capitalism. Could a new sort of central planning help Chinese technology dominate the world stage? And how should the West respond?


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The persecution of a people: China’s repression of the Uyghurs
21 perc 1711. rész

Reporting by The Economist reveals deepening efforts by Chinese authorities not just to imprison the Muslim-minority people but also to reduce their number, to wipe out their culture and to hound them wherever in the world they may go. Yet a visit to Yunnan province reveals that the party’s hostility to ethnic minorities is not absolute.

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Loved Labour’s won: landslide in New Zealand
21 perc 1710. rész

After a term spent steering the country through crises, Jacinda Ardern has led her Labour party to a thumping victory; what will they do with their historic majority? Far from taking on water as the pandemic progresses, the shipping industry is steaming ahead. And as museums sell off parts of their collections, we consider art’s value beyond the dollar signs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: October 19th 2020
22 perc 1709. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the persecution of the Uyghurs, Trumponomics (11:05), and Formula 1: man vs machine (17:20). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Joe’s job
42 perc 1708. rész

No candidate challenging a sitting president has had a poll lead bigger than Joe Biden’s this close to election day. His allure owes a lot to who he is not. The Democrats coalesced around the former Vice President only when the more radical Bernie Sanders threatened to nab the nomination. Who is Joe Biden and what does he want?

 

The Economist’s US business editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran explains why Wall St is coming round to Biden and we look back at his foreign policy record and role in the Iraq war. Also, Biden’s former deputy chief of staff Scott Mulhauser tells us what makes him tick.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Más MAS? Bolivia’s election
21 perc 1707. rész

After last year’s vote was marred by fraud allegations, the electorate is split ahead of Sunday’s poll: will the country return the socialist MAS party of exiled leader Evo Morales to power? A private tutor to the rich and anxious reveals the costs—to students and tutors—of heightened academic pressure. And a new book yields a cat’s-eye view of 18th-century London.

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The Economist Asks: Martin Amis
33 perc 1706. rész

The British novelist tells host Anne McElvoy how anyone can become “an expert on words”. She asks Amis, who first became famous when he published "The Rachel Papers" in 1973 in his mid-twenties, why he never reads young authors and new books now. As he enters his seventies and after writing 14 novels, could "Inside Story" be his last? Also, what does the Statue of Liberty mean to him today?

 

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A close-it call: Nigeria’s uprising
22 perc 1705. rész

Angry protests following an alleged police killing continue, even after a hated police unit was shuttered. That exposes far-deeper discontent. Banks’ earnings this week show that belt-tightening earlier in the year has held them in good stead. What to do with the growing cash-pile? And misguided infrastructure plans have many Egyptians in a roads rage.

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Babbage: The Metaverse is coming
28 perc 1704. rész

We explore computer-generated virtual worlds and their use in everything from film-making to architecture. What will it take to build a real Metaverse, a persistent virtual world that anyone can plug into? This vision, though born in the minds of science fiction writers, is shaping the real-world ambitions of much of the tech world. Host Alok Jha talks to author Neal Stephenson, VR pioneer Jaron Lanier and the VFX team behind The Mandalorian. 


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Scared strait: Taiwan
23 perc 1703. rész

Rhetoric and sabre-rattling from mainland China are rapidly ramping up; we examine the risk of an invasion that would have global consequences. A decision by World Rugby to ban trans women from the women’s game stokes a notoriously ill-tempered debate. And listening to an album built entirely from the songs of endangered British birds.

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Money Talks: The prize is right
25 perc 1500. rész

This year’s Nobel prize rewards two economists who reimagined an ancient form of transaction—the auction. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks one of the winners, Paul Milgrom, how he put his cutting-edge theory into practice. Plus, the $100bn bet that has not paid off: why SoftBank’s Vision Fund failed to supercharge tech start-ups. And, how are investors hedging against the risk of post-election volatility in America?


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Food chain broken: famine in Yemen
22 perc 1500. rész

The country yet again faces widespread starvation as a civil war grinds on, and both sides are to blame for the misery visited upon civilians. With the stroke of a pen, Argentina recently doubled in size—setting a precedent with big diplomatic and resource-extraction implications. And remembering the man who set hundreds of thousands of Indians free from indentured servitude.

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In their own Swede time: pandemic pragmatism
23 perc 1500. rész

By the numbers to date, Sweden's light-touch covid-19 measures may not seem successful. But its pragmatism takes an instructively long view of the pandemic. China’s high-level party machinery brooks no political dissent; among street-level functionaries, stories of disobedience and tolerance are far more nuanced. And a devilishly clever way to stem the poaching of endangered turtles’ eggs.

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Editor’s Picks: October 5th 2020
23 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Ant group and fintech come of age, economic disparities after covid-19 (09:30) the US election in miniature (17:00). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Florida’s key
36 perc 1500. rész

A covid-19 outbreak in the White House threatens President Trump’s chances of reelection. Behind in national polls, his path to victory once again goes through the Electoral College. He must win Florida, his adopted home state and the biggest battleground of all. Which way will the sunshine state flip this time?


We speak to Republican pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson and look at Florida’s two key demographics: senior citizens and Hispanics. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Buy the way? Kyrgyzstan’s post-election chaos
21 perc 1500. rész

Citizens are furious after a poll seemingly tainted by vote-buying; its annulment leaves a power vacuum that may yet draw in China and Russia. An author’s journey through the history of America’s racist militias, including the Ku Klux Klan, starts with his own family tree. And why not everyone is happy with Europe’s “golden passport” schemes. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Fareed Zakaria & John Micklethwait
31 perc 1500. rész

Which countries passed and failed "the great covid test"? CNN’s Fareed Zakaria and John Micklethwait, the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg, have both written books assessing countries' responses to covid-19 and how governments should adapt to the post-pandemic world. Is the global centre of gravity shifting from West to East? 


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More-civil discourse: Pence and Harris debate
23 perc 1500. rész

That a housefly could steal the show at America’s only vice-presidential debate is telling, but a discussion with more substance than bombast was a welcome respite. Cuba is experiencing its worst food crisis in decades, and that at last may spur changes to its confused and market-distorting dual-currency system. And geopolitics sticks its beak into an enormous annual bird migration.

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Babbage: Nobel minds
27 perc 1500. rész

Host Kenneth Cukier explores the science honoured in this year’s Nobel prizes. Our correspondents assess the life-saving impact of the identification of hepatitis C, speak to one of this year’s winners for physics, Andrea Ghez, about her work unveiling the mysteries of the cosmos, and Jennifer Doudna, co-developer of CRISPR-Cas9, on the potential of genome editing. Plus, can the awards adapt to modern science?


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Clerical era: Iraq in a hard place
19 perc 1500. rész

A pilgrimage that is sure to become a covid-19 hotspot is a sign of how much the country’s government is losing legitimacy to its clergymen and tribal leaders. Social-media giants’ efforts to scrub violent content from their platforms simultaneously hobbles efforts to bring war criminals to justice. And why south-west England may soon be reviving its long-lost mining industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: GiAnt of finance
25 perc 1500. rész

Ant Group, the world’s biggest fintech platform, is preparing for a record-busting IPO. Is it a glimpse of the future of finance? Suzanne Clark, president of the US Chamber of Commerce, tells us how she thinks the elections will reshape America Inc. And, another Bond-film cliffhanger: can cinemas survive until the latest one shows up? Simon Long hosts


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Sailing into the wind: Boris Johnson
22 perc 1500. rész

Britain’s prime minister will outline big wind-energy plans at his party’s annual conference, even as the pandemic and Brexit blow his government off course. The sombre tone at a thanksgiving festival in Ethiopia reveals how the country’s largest ethnic group is not getting the reforms it was promised. And a carcinogenic nut that remains wildly popular in China.

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Ill-disposed: Trump’s hospital stay
21 perc 1500. rész

Amid a flurry of conflicting information over the weekend, details of Donald Trump’s progress and prognosis remain worryingly unclear. How will this brush with the virus change the campaign, or the president? Asia’s migrant workers had difficult, precarious lives that the pandemic made even worse; only now are matters improving. And the perplexing preponderance of Albanian pop stars. 

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Editor’s Picks: October 5th 2020
27 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Bidenomics, Chinese officials want to erase many villages (12:00) and ethnic minorities in Britain (19:10). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Reality wreck
39 perc 1500. rész

The president’s tweet announcing his positive coronavirus test was his most shared ever - a shocking fact amid a mire of misinformation. This week’s angry TV debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden highlighted how even the truth has become a partisan issue. Can reality be reclaimed?


We speak to MIT’s Sinan Aral, author of The Hype Machine, and Adam Roberts, The Economist’s Midwest correspondent reports from Iowa.

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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The Economist is seeking applicants for two paid fellowships in America.

 

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In Syria’s trouble: an embattled despot digs in
22 perc 1500. rész

Unexpected defeats at rebels’ hands, a cratered economy, a hungry citizenry and a runaway covid-19 epidemic: can anything unseat Bashar al-Assad? When Germany reunified, many worried it would upset the balance of Europe; 30 years on and if anything the country must wield more of its power. And celebrating the centenary of Agatha Christie’s most beloved detective, Hercule Poirot. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Phillippe Reines
28 perc 1500. rész

After President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden's first televised presidential debate resulted in a shout show, Anne McElvoy asks how candidates can win or lose a debate. Phillipe Reines was Hilary Clinton’s long term adviser who prepared her for the 2016 debates by studying Mr Trump’s style and played Trump in rehearsals. Did Trump's bullish technique work and how should Biden react as he walks "into the chainsaw"?


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Enclave on edge: Armenia and Azerbaijan
19 perc 1499. rész

The region of Nagorno-Karabakh has been the subject of dispute and skirmishes for decades—but the current conflict threatens to draw in both Turkey and Russia. Rule changes accelerated by the pandemic have revealed a better way to handle early-stage abortions. And, unravelling the mystery of the funnel-web spider’s deadly bite. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Apple's Epic battle
25 perc 1500. rész

This week a judge heard the first arguments in an antitrust case that could reshape the software ecosystem. Who will be the real winners and losers of this digital deathmatch? Quantum computers have limited capabilities, but the technology may yet live up to its promise. And, how understanding the evolutionary history of exercise could help get people moving. Kenneth Cukier hosts. 



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Shoutshow: Trump and Biden clash
23 perc 1500. rész

America’s first presidential debate was unmitigated chaos, revealing little more than the rancour between the candidates. In Chicago a newish musical genre called drill has a strong relation to the city’s gang violence; we ask whether it is a causal one. And amid a global rise in hand-washing, we look at the fascinating, fragrant history of soap.

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Money Talks: A plague but not on houses
23 perc 1500. rész

What is driving the global boom in house prices during the pandemic? Also, American fintech firms have long distanced themselves from traditional banking—so why are some now angling to become banks themselves? And, reflections on the life of Donald Kendall, the legendary PepsiCo boss who sparked the most epic battle in American marketing. Simon Long hosts.


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No-tax-and-spend policy: Trump’s tax returns
21 perc 1500. rész

Just ahead of the first presidential debate, a trove of tax documents suggests the president has some staggeringly loss-making businesses and a staggering amount of debt coming due. We examine China’s pledge to become carbon-neutral by 2060 and what it will have to do to get there. And why a Swiss referendum campaign involved a giant game of pick-up-sticks.

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The World Ahead: The future of work
21 perc 1500. rész

With work habits around the work changing because of covid-19, host Tom Standage considers the future of the office. What lessons can be learned from companies like GitHub, where most employees are remote? What can providers of flexible workspaces, such as IWG, reveal about trends in office use? What does team-building look like in a world where remote working is more widespread? And what are the implications for pay, housing costs, equality and labour laws?

 

Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)


Read more speculative scenarios at "The World If" and please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

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Bench press: Trump’s Supreme Court pick
23 perc 1500. rész

On gun rights, abortion policy and health care Amy Coney Barrett, the seemingly unstoppable successor to Ruth Bader Ginsburg, will shift the court’s balance for decades. In China, the visually impaired are usually shuffled off to the massage industry; we meet blind students with greater ambitions. And tracing the origins of the boring supermarket spud. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: September 28th 2020
23 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, covid-19: why are so many governments getting it wrong? What Warren Buffett sees in Japan Inc (8:11) and French diplomacy (16:00).

 

 

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Checks and balance: Confirmation bias
38 perc 1500. rész

Economist modelling suggests November's election may end Republican control of the Senate. The Republican leadership plans to push through the appointment of a new Supreme Court justice to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg before then. Democrats are threatening to retaliate by reforming anti-majoritarian Senate rules if they win back control. Should the Senate change?


James Astill, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief and data journalist Elliott Morris contribute.

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Another matter: the Breonna Taylor verdict
23 perc 1500. rész

A grand jury’s decision has re-energised months-long protests. We ask how much another tragic death at the hands of police may spur meaningful reforms. A once-fringe movement to “re-wild” the Highlands of Scotland is gaining momentum. And how the promising German startup incubator Rocket Internet left shareholders on the launchpad.

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The Economist Asks: Hilary Swank
20 perc 1500. rész

Anne McElvoy asks two-time Academy Award winner Hilary Swank whether the new rules intended to encourage diversity in film will work. The actress argues for change in the Oscars but worries that new diversity standards could limit which stories are told. Why does she enjoy breaking stereotypes, what it’s like filming in the covid-era—and the Hollywood star gives her pitch to play the next James Bond.

 

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Winter is coming: covid-19’s next phase
24 perc 1500. rész

Soon the pandemic will have claimed a million lives. We take a broad look at what has been learned—and the deadly mistakes still being made. Our correspondent visits Wuhan, site of the first known outbreak, to find a city that beneath the surface has much healing yet to do. And a close look at New York’s much-loved, much-derided accent.

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Babbage: Pandemic’s progress
27 perc 1500. rész

As the global covid-19 death toll nears 1 million, The Economist’s healthcare correspondent and health policy editor explain what scientists are still investigating about the virus, how long-lasting is the immune response and how the pandemic can be tamed. And, the model of Taiwan—is it “post-pandemic”? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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America’s next top chamber, modelled: the Senate battle
22 perc 1500. rész

Congressional elections will decide the direction of America’s governance irrespective of the presidential pick; we reveal our statistical model of the Senate races. Tesla steals the headlines in the electric-vehicle stakes, but a vast, global industry is nipping at its heels. And remembering the astrophysicist who explained the celestial light show of the aurorae.

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Money Talks: Power in the 21st century
31 perc 1500. rész

Oil fuelled the 20th century, but now a huge energy shock is catalysing a shift to a new world order. Charlotte Howard, The Economist's energy and commodities editor, and host Rachana Shanbhogue investigate why this oil slump is different. They ask Spencer Dale, BP's chief economist, whether the world has passed peak oil. Daniel Yergin, author of “The New Map” and “The Prize”, explains how cleaner energy will reshape geopolitics. And Kevin Tu, of Beijing Normal University, on China's new role as a global powerhouse of electrification.


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Stumbling block: the battle over WeChat
22 perc 1500. rész

The Trump administration’s bid to block the Chinese app has been stymied—for now. The tussle reflects a change in how America does business, and how the internet itself may evolve. Migration in the Mediterranean is picking up again; the pandemic is making it even more perilous and political. And Japan’s canned-coffee obsession steams ahead in foreign markets.

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Judge dread—the fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat
22 perc 1500. rész

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a liberal icon. Her death last week opens a Supreme Court vacancy for Donald Trump to fill, which could tip the court further right ahead of what might be a legally fraught election. And there is nothing that Democrats can do about it. The majority of land in Africa is neither mapped nor documented. People who can’t prove that they own their land, cannot unlock its value. That is holding back the continent’s economies. And Japan may be famous for its slick and speedy bullet trains. But the country’s rural railways have reached the end of the line. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: September 21st 2020
18 perc 1499. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: 21st century power, the birth of the Frankenfirm (09:40) and, why no one is called Linda in Saudi Arabia (15:00).

 

 

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Checks and balance: Suburban brawl
33 perc 1500. rész

Donald Trump hopes fear of unrest and rising crime will appeal to the “suburban housewives” he tweets about. It’s a strategy borrowed from Richard Nixon, who first harnessed the political power of suburban voters to win the White House. But two years ago the Democrats took control of Congress by winning suburbia. Who will win the suburban vote this time?


We speak to election forecaster Rachel Bitecofer, Candace Valenzuela, who is running for Congress in the Texas suburbs, and look back to the battles over segregation that shaped the politics of suburbia.

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Uneasy lies the head: Thailand’s under-fire king
23 perc 1500. rész

Thailand is bracing for a large anti-government protest, with some of the anger directed at the usually-revered monarchy. Some fear that the establishment’s patience will snap, with bloody results. Freemasonry has been one of the most contagious ideas of the modern age, spreading to every corner of the world. But the number of masons is shrinking. And in Britain, social distancing may have shut nightclubs. But many ravers don’t tech-no for an answer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: David Cameron
40 perc 1500. rész

A former British prime minister is optimistic there will be a post-Brexit trade deal. Anne McElvoy asks him if ill-tempered trade negotiations have damaged Britain's global reputation—and what he really makes of Boris Johnson. Also, what could he have done differently when intervening in Afghanistan and did he, as alleged, run a "government of chums"?


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Conviction politics: Florida’s disenfranchised felons
22 perc 1500. rész

More than a million former felons in Florida regained the right to vote in 2018. Last week, many of them lost it again. We look at the barriers to voting in America. Colombia’s militarised police force are khaki-klad, poorly paid and heavy-handed. A case of police brutality has now provoked big protests and calls for reform. And in the Netherlands, covid-carrying Minks have been spared the slaughterhouse. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Rosalind Franklin
27 perc 1500. rész

100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19?

 

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Sanctuary in Sochi: Belarus’ dictator clings on
20 perc 1500. rész

Belarus dictator, Alexander Lukashenko, has travelled to Sochi amid major protests at home to ask Vladimir Putin for help. We examine whether he will get it—and what the price might be. The possible discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus could be a tantalising hint of life beyond Earth. And K-Pop, marred by sexual abuse scandals, is shedding its misogynistic image. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Can Oracle see TikTok’s future?
24 perc 1500. rész

After Microsoft's takeover bid was rejected, a new deal with Oracle, a big software company, could allow the Chinese-owned social-video app to continue operating in America without a sale. The wolf, the diamonds and the foreign minister: why the biggest luxury-goods deal in history, LVMH’s purchase of Tiffany, has been put on ice. And covid-19 is putting capitalism to the test—which market models come out on top? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


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After Abe: Japan’s new prime minister
21 perc 1500. rész

Japan’s new prime minister will be Yoshihide Suga, the son of a strawberry farmer from the country’s rural north. We look at whether he can step into the shoes of Abe Shinzo and revive Japan’s troubled economy. America may be leaving the World Health Organisation, but the institution has handled the pandemic well. And the standing of dogs in Islam is hounding clerics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Homework: the future of the office
21 perc 1500. rész

The pandemic has been a giant experiment in working from home. We examine whether workers are happier and more productive using Zoom in their pyjamas than commuting in a suit. In the southern hemisphere, the seasonal flu seems to have faded, as a happy byproduct of lockdown and social distancing. And an obituary for one of Pol Pot’s murderous lieutenants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: September 14th 2020
22 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is the office finished? Land reform in poor countries (09:55), and Mexico’s unsellable presidential jet (18:10). 

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Boomers KO’d
34 perc 1500. rész

Baby-boomers have dominated American politics since the 1990s, but this election may be their last stand. Shifting demographics do not favour Donald Trump, the boomer-in-chief. Younger Americans are more diverse, more educated, more likely to vote Democrat. Is the boomer era over?


We speak to William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, look back to what Barack Obama called the “psychodrama” of boomer politics, and ahead to what might replace it.

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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Great walls of fire: America’s west coast burns
21 perc 1500. rész

Relentless climate change will make devastating blazes more likely; urbanisation in woodland areas will make them more costly. Prevention measures could help—if updated and widened. “Anti-vaxxers” may undermine coming covid-vaccination efforts; we examine the history of a baseless and dangerous movement. And things turn nasty among the biker gangs of northern Europe. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Reed Hastings
28 perc 1500. rész

Netflix has had a blockbuster year as lockdowns supercharged subscriptions. But competition is intensifying and the American streaming market is close to saturation. Anne McElvoy asks the company’s co-founder and co-CEO how much more Netflix can still grow. How does he respond to the charge that its data-driven entertainment is creating a monoculture? And, why he envies the BBC but fears Disney.


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Genocidal intent? Deserters recount Rohingya atrocities
22 perc 1500. rész

Two Burmese soldiers have described in harrowing detail what has long been alleged: that the army targeted Muslim-minority Rohingya in a programme of ethnic cleansing. America’s Department of State has been hollowed out and wholly demoralised—and that has dire implications for global diplomacy. And a wildly popular Chinese television show reveals shifting mores for thirty-somethings.

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Babbage: Burning down the house
21 perc 1500. rész

Wildfires are raging across California as the state experiences a record heatwave. Climate change and irresponsible building has resulted in billions of dollars in damage. How can developers build better fire-proof homes? Also, investigative journalist James Ball on who owns the internet. And, dream on—do dreams reflect reality? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Unpicking the thread: forced labour in Xinjiang
21 perc 1500. rész

Sanctions are tightening around the Chinese province amid suspicions of forced labour. Western firms that are reliant on the region’s cotton and other commodities are in a bind. The pandemic has shown the merits of some governments’ digitised bureaucracies, but rushing the digital shift comes with risks. And how Canada’s border closures threaten a tiny town in remotest Alaska. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Double bubble, is tech in trouble?
26 perc 1500. rész

The rise and rise of American stockmarkets has faltered; what is behind the selloff in tech shares? Netflix has had a blockbuster year but faces rising costs and stiff competition. Its co-founder Reed Hastings argues the American streaming giant still has plenty of room to grow. And, what is wrong with the concept of “net zero” carbon emissions? Patrick Lane hosts.


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Subcontinental drift: India’s covid spike
20 perc 1500. rész

A hurried lockdown early in the pandemic has cratered the country’s economy, and infection rates are now shooting up. More suffering lies ahead, on both counts. The United Nations peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo has failed for 20 years running, and now there is pressure for it to decamp. And the transatlantic tale of the baked bean.

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Pact unpacked: wobbly Brexit talks
20 perc 1500. rész

Negotiations on Britain’s post-Brexit relationship with Europe were floundering—even before revelations it may essentially rewrite parts of the last pact it struck. Since the space race’s early days, satellites have been involved in defence. Now a new threat looms: armed conflict between the satellites themselves. And a card game reveals the Lebanese people’s resilience and dark sense of humour.

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Editor’s Picks: September 7th 2020
20 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ugly election: How bad could it get? How Abe Shinzo changed Japan (8:35) and why Britons walk their dogs so much (16:00).

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Voter confidence
39 perc 1500. rész

November’s election threatens to be ugly. President Trump’s supporters are clashing with Black Lives Matter protesters in Portland. Covid-19 complicates voting. The result may not be clear on election night. Many Americans worry the election could herald violent discord and a constitutional crisis rather than a smooth exercise of democracy. Should they be concerned?


We speak to Myrna Perez of the Brennan Center for Justice and Professor Kathleen Hale, who runs the graduate programme in election administration at Auburn University. 

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent, and Idrees Kahloon, US policy correspondent.


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Back to the future-planning: France
22 perc 1500. rész

Alongside a green-minded, 100bn-euro stimulus, President Emmanuel Macron’s recovery plan borrows ideas from the post-war past to imagine a post-covid future. The mysterious arrest of Paul Rusesabagina, hero of the film “Hotel Rwanda”, shows just how far the country’s leaders will go to suppress dissent. And a careful, revealing study of nappy prices across Europe. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Philip Tetlock
22 perc 1500. rész

In the face of electoral upsets and viral black swans, Anne McElvoy asks the cofounder of the Good Judgement “superforecaster” project whether today’s future-gazers should still rely on historical precedent. As pollsters compete to predict who will win the US presidential election, what lessons have yet to be learned from 2016? And, where to spot the next black swan—or at least a dark grey one.


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Rough seas and safe seats: Caribbean elections
21 perc 1500. rész

The outcome of Jamaica’s election isn’t much in doubt. What’s uncertain is how the wider Caribbean can handle rock-bottom tourism and looming hurricane risks amid the pandemic. North Korea’s leadership at last admitted to the hardships of covid-19; the coming human cost could rival that of the famine in the 1990s. And why African countries put out so many unlikely stamps.

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Babbage: The fast and the spurious
26 perc 1500. rész

Governments around the world are approving covid-19 drugs and vaccines at an unprecedented speed, but Natasha Loder, The Economist's Health Policy Editor, warns of the dangers that this could cause. Also, is Elon Musk's plan to link a computer to human brains science or spin? And, take a deep breath—author James Nestor on improving the quality of our breathing. Kenneth Cukier hosts. 


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In a class, by themselves: pupils head back to school
21 perc 1500. rész

Millions of schoolchildren are heading back to classes, many of them online. We examine the evidence on virtual learning and how it deepens inequalities. Dubai is a glittering financial hub, connecting the Middle East, Asia and Europe—but to keep its position it will have to shed its dirty-money reputation. And why the pandemic has readers pulling weighty classics from shelves.

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Money Talks: The shape of recovery
23 perc 1500. rész

While big tech and Wall Street are breaking records, main-street businesses are struggling to survive; governments and central banks must decide whether they can afford to dig deeper to help. Six months into the pandemic, host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Patrick Foulis, The Economist's business affairs editor, Wall Street correspondent Alice Fulwood and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, US business editor, is it time for repeat prescriptions or a new economic diagnosis?


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Integration, differentiation: migrants in Germany
22 perc 1500. rész

Five years ago, a vast wave of migrants and refugees began to spill into the country. We examine their fates amid a tangle of bureaucracy. Even for the uninfected, the coronavirus has caused widespread “collective trauma”; we ask about its effects and how to heal from it. And Palestinians sneak to the beach as security forces look the other way.

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The World Ahead: Peak plane?
22 perc 1500. rész

In this episode we consider the future of travel. What if aviation doesn’t recover from covid-19? We find out how one airline is turning crisis into opportunity, consider how to make flying greener—and examine how the combination of the pandemic, and growing concern about climate change, is affecting attitudes to travel. Tom Standage hosts

 

 

Read more speculative scenarios at "The World If" and please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 


 

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Ill be going: Abe Shinzo’s legacy
19 perc 1500. rész

Japan’s longest-serving prime minister leaves behind a mixed bag of policy successes and shortcomings. We examine his legacy and ask what his successor faces. The annual meeting of central bankers in Jackson Hole—online, of course—revealed research suggesting today’s economic woes will ring down for decades to come. And the curious appeal of in-flight meals eaten on terra firma.

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Editor’s Picks: August 31st 2020
20 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what Putin fears, (9:10) Trump at the Republican National Convention and (16:10) France’s university to rival MIT

 

 

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Checks and Balance: A family affair
44 perc 1500. rész

Grandees were gone from this week’s Republican convention, replaced by Trump family members and ordinary folk caught in the culture wars. The president has also kicked aside the three pillars that propped up Ronald Reagan’s Republicans: moral and global leadership plus sound finances. What do Republicans stand for now?

 

We speak to Hogan Gidley from the Trump campaign and Elliott Morris, data journalist for The Economist.

 

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Idrees Kahloon, US policy correspondent.


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Shot down, in flames: Kenosha, Wisconsin
20 perc 1500. rész

Another shooting of an unarmed black man by police has reopened wounds still not healed after George Floyd’s killing—and, like all else, the unrest is being politicised. Montenegro’s president is Europe’s longest-serving leader, but anti-government sentiment has mounted ahead of Sunday’s election. And a look back on the life of Julian Bream, who restored the reputation of the classical guitar.

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The Economist Asks: Janet Napolitano
30 perc 1500. rész

The world’s universities face a new academic year like no other. Anne McElvoy asks Janet Napolitano, until recently president of the sprawling University of California system, whether higher education can pass the test of covid-19. Can universities survive without legions of high-paying international students, and convince increasingly sceptical young people that their degrees are worth the investment?


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Team-building exercise: America’s Middle East diplomacy
22 perc 1500. rész

American officials hope more Arab states will follow the United Arab Emirates in normalising relations with Israel; the groundwork for that has been quietly laid for years. Not every expectant mother wants all those doctors and nurses fussing over them; we take a look at the increasing politicisation of childbirth. And a step change for robots that can walk. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Viruses, lords of creation
29 perc 1500. rész

These tiny, ancient predators do more than cause pandemics. Host Kenneth Cukier and science editor Geoff Carr investigate how viruses have shaped the world. Evolutionary biologist David Enard explains how viruses have driven human development. And Jennifer Doudna, who pioneered CRISPR gene editing, and Steffanie Strathdee, an innovator in phage therapy, show how cells’ antiviral defences as well as  viruses themselves can be harnessed to protect the future of humanity.


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The grande scheme of things: corruption in Mexico
22 perc 1500. rész

The former head of the state-owned oil firm has presented stunning claims of high-level graft. Are they credible, and will the president pursue them? Museum curators usually try to add to their collections, but a new generation steeped in the restitution debate is doing just the opposite. And a data-led analysis of the suggestion that Twitter suppresses conservative views. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Blockbust-up
24 perc 1500. rész

China is poised to become the world’s biggest box office. Is this an opportunity for Hollywood or could it be a show-stopper? As the dollar hovers around its weakest level in two years, we ask how it became so central to the world economy and whether this spells the beginning of the end for dollar dominance. And economist Sir Paul Collier argues that individualism is holding back society. Patrick Lane hosts 


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Insecurity services? Alexei Navalny’s poisoning
22 perc 1500. rész

Doctors believe Russia’s opposition leader was poisoned, and suspicion naturally falls on the Kremlin. Why might the country’s leadership have taken such a risk? For LGBT people coming out is, in many places, far easier and more commonplace than it once was—thanks in part to the internet. And why a younger generation is shunning Laos’s traditional ant-egg soup. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Isle take it: Turkey’s adventures in the Med
21 perc 1500. rész

The considerable oil and gas reserves beneath the eastern Mediterranean have sparked Turkey’s interest—as well as a number of disputes in the region and beyond. China’s leaders like to say their country has history’s longest-surviving civilisation; now a new archaeological site allegedly offers some proof. And the grave risk to the world’s tallest trees. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: August 24th 2020
24 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how viruses shape the world, (10:25) African-American elites and Black Lives Matter, (18:22) and how misrule by algorithm is failing Britain.

 

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Checks and Balance: Coalition control
37 perc 1500. rész

The Democrats used their convention this week to showcase the breadth of the coalition built to oust President Trump. Republican defectors shared a platform with leftists like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. But climate, minority rights, even capitalism, are all areas of disagreement. Can Joe Biden unite the party?


Host John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, with Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent, and Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief. 


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod 


The Economist is seeking applicants for two paid fellowships in America.

 

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In over its head of state: Mali’s coup
21 perc 1500. rész

The military has again ousted the president, after months of protests and years of ethnic violence. Fresh elections or no, whoever comes out on top faces a tough job. We survey the pandemic-era dining-out landscape, finding that restaurants are about so much more than the food. And the Chinese trawlers that are stripping the rich waters of the Galapagos. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Bill Gates
25 perc 1500. rész

Our editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes asks the philanthropist and co-founder of Microsoft what it will take to defeat the coronavirus. They talk about why a Biden presidency might not transform America’s prospects of defeating the pandemic. And, as rich countries scramble to be front of the queue for vaccines, should it be down to charitable billionaires to fund vaccinating the world's poorest?


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Not free, not fair, not finished: Belarus’s election
21 perc 1500. rész

Huge protests following a rigged election reveal that the people have had enough of “Europe’s last dictator”, Alexander Lukashenko. How long can he hang on? Indonesia’s leaders risk repeating an environmental disaster on Borneo, allegedly in the name of food security. And checking the writing chops of the world’s best-read artificial intelligence. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Long-haul plight
23 perc 1500. rész

Some victims of covid-19 continue to suffer from the illness many weeks and months after falling ill. What can be done to help these “long-haulers”? Also, the technology writer Matt Ridley on how innovation works. And, a possible solution to 2020’s other plague: locust swarms. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


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Blast from the past: a long-awaited verdict in Lebanon
22 perc 1500. rész

For 15 years, the truck-bomb killing of a former prime minister went unpunished. But an even more devastating recent blast overshadowed a court’s ruling on the culprits. Chinese students hoping to study in America have been caught in the middle of the countries’ rising animus—not for the first time. And the origins of all the hair in Nigeria’s wildly popular wigs.

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Money Talks: Party like it’s 1999
20 perc 1500. rész

Tech companies are lining up to go public, while America’s stockmarkets fly high. What explains the exuberance on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley in the middle of a deep recession? How long will the fun last? And, Jim McKelvey, the founder of payments company Square on how innovation can thrive in economic chaos. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts


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From Chapo to Mencho: Mexico’s cartels
23 perc 1500. rész

Mexico’s new top cartel, led by a kingpin called El Mencho, has taken the country’s shocking violence to a terrifyingly brazen new level. In Tunisia, ten years after a self-immolation sparked the Arab Spring, voters are disillusioned with democracy and even nostalgic for the old days. And reflecting on the pianist who lost the use of his right hand, and reinvented his playing around his left. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Insufficient postage: the fight over America’s mail service
21 perc 1500. rész

The US Postal Service is one of America’s most popular and necessary public institutions. Now it is at the centre of a battle over November’s election. The growth of microfinance in Cambodia has been for the most part positive, but the pandemic is posing challenges to its sustainability. And if you want to buy a used Airbus A380, it’s a buyer’s market. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: August 17th 2020
19 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Xi Jinping is reinventing state capitalism (10:20), Belarus’s sham election (14:25), and the decline of the office romance.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: California vice
34 perc 1500. rész

After a deliberately quiet few months, Presidential frontrunner Joe Biden seized the news cycle this week by announcing Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate. We hear about what she really stands for. And we ask what her time as California’s Attorney General tells us about how she would wield power in practice.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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To a concerning degree: dire climate assessments
22 perc 1500. rész

Recent reports paint a dark picture, from heatwaves to hurricanes to high-water marks. But some promising trends—and pandemic-era economics—provide reasons for hope. We examine the night-time economy of the very swankiest parties, discovering a kind of beauty brokerage at work behind the scenes. And what baseball season reveals for other sports that yearn for a return. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Mira Nair
24 perc 1500. rész

Adapting “A Suitable Boy”, Vikram Seth’s epic novel about marriage, politics and social upheaval in newly independent India, for the small screen was a labour of love for its director. Mira Nair talks to Anne McElvoy about why she worked with a white writer on this Indian classic, the eternal fascination of the matchmaker and the yoga pose that gets her in the right frame of mind.


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Youngish, gifted and black: Kamala Harris
20 perc 1500. rész

Joe Biden’s choice of running mate is simultaneously groundbreaking and conventional, and reveals much about the state of the Democratic party. In China, a surprise court ruling draws attention to the plight of oft-overlooked LGBT people in the workplace. And Japan’s broad push for self-driving ships. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: WeFight
19 perc 1500. rész

For Chinese users, WeChat does far more than just messaging. What are the implications of America’s proposed ban on the Chinese “super app”? Also, Canada’s last full Arctic shelf has collapsed, and climate change is to blame. And a sizzling solution to indoor barbeque pollution. Tom Standage hosts 


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Therein Lai’s a tale: Hong Kong’s revealing arrests
22 perc 1500. rész

The dramatic arrest of Jimmy Lai, a pro-democracy newspaper owner, reveals just how enthusiastically Beijing’s new security law will be deployed to quash any dissent. A reservoir is filling behind an enormous new dam in Ethiopia—and that has soured relations with Egypt downriver. And why Britain’s “urban explorers” may soon have far fewer derelict buildings to conquer.

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Money Talks: Tik for Tok
25 perc 1500. rész

Relations between America and China are at a fresh low. What do Donald Trump’s latest threats mean for Chinese businesses? Also, the coronavirus has had a disastrous effect on Saudi Aramco’s earnings. How can the state-controlled oil company weather the extreme conditions? And, the bumps ahead for America’s $800bn trucking industry. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 



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Buy now, save later: financing vaccine candidates
22 perc 1500. rész

As clinical trials progress, policymakers must determine how heavily to fund the pre-emptive manufacture of candidate vaccines, and how to distribute the successful ones. Given Britain’s bungled pandemic response, the separatist mood in Scotland has surged to record levels. And travel tips from the vloggers of illegal migration.

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Bytes and pieces: America’s Chinese-tech attack
21 perc 1500. rész

First it was Bytedance’s app TikTok, now it’s Tencent’s WeChat: the Trump administration’s fervour to ban or dismantle wildly popular Chinese apps is increasing. In these straitened times, employees naturally worry that robots and software are coming for jobs—but the pandemic may actually slow that transition. And Britain’s government suggests slimming down even as it subsidises meals out.

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Editor’s Picks: August 10th 2020
27 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the absent student, (9:55) Beirut: a city in ruins, (19:45) and why TV from China’s Hunan province has become so popular.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: The art of losing
45 perc 1500. rész

The Economist's election forecast shows Joe Biden heading for a landslide victory. But August is not November. President Trump has recently shifted focus back to the coronavirus in an attempt to rescue his reelection bid and Republicans have outpaced Democrats in swing-state voter registration. How can fortunes change during a campaign? We ask Stuart Stevens, chief strategist of several Republican campaigns, author and political consultant, and Matt Bennett, Democratic presidential adviser and executive vice-president at Third Way a centrist think-tank.


Host John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, with Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent, and Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief. 


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That history should not repeat: Hiroshima’s storytellers
22 perc 1500. rész

Survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings are now in their eighties. A new generation is learning to tell their tales, in hopes of preventing more atomic tragedies. Belarus’s president of 26 years will probably win in Sunday’s election, but an invigorated—and unexpected—opposition has him on the back foot. And the horror movie that will make you nervous to use Zoom. 

Additional archive courtesy of Soka Gakkai Women’s Peace Committee. Additional sounds by InspectorJ at Freesound.org. 

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The Economist Asks: Darren Walker
26 perc 1500. rész

The coronavirus pandemic has widened inequality in America but has also supercharged charitable giving. Host Anne McElvoy asks Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, whether philanthropy can help save the American Dream. Will companies that proclaim the new era of "stakeholder capitalism" actually sideline their shareholders? And as the number of empty plinths grows, which forgotten heroes deserve to fill them? 


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A broken system, a broken city: Beirut
22 perc 1500. rész

Some 300,000 people are homeless after an explosion of unthinkable size. The culprit appears to be sheer negligence, brought on by a broken system of governance. The Economist’s data team has updated its excess-death tracker, giving ever-better insight into just how deadly covid-19 is. And the tricky trade-offs for both bosses and workers as they return to the office. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Babbage: Put to the test
25 perc 1500. rész

A shortage of covid-19 tests around the world has hampered efforts to contain it. Could "pool sampling" be a solution? Also, the promise of million-mile electric car batteries? And, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and Caltech, on the mysteries of life after conception. Kenneth Cukier hosts 

 

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One nation, under gods? India’s divisive temple
20 perc 1500. rész

Consecration at Ayodhya, the country’s most contested holy site, is another tick box in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu-nationalist agenda. Is India’s foundational secularism at risk? The pandemic has been particularly cruel for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s; we examine new research that gives them a ray of hope. And the massive, wheel-terms growth in e-bike sales. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: Yearnings season
23 perc 1500. rész

The global pandemic has hit American companies hard, reflected in the latest earnings season, and it could be many quarters before a return to profitability. In Europe, Germany is used to being an economic powerhouse, but the virus has left it in a slump. And, could central banks ditch cash in favour of virtual money? Simon Long hosts 


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Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads
19 perc 1500. rész

Since the Arab Spring the country has vastly expanded its military and diplomatic efforts—filling an evident power vacuum and harking back to the days of the Ottoman Empire. Tanzania’s economy was recently upgraded to “middle-income” status, but our analysis suggests something is fishy in its data. And why an Athens hotel will have two floors lopped off its top. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong
23 perc 1500. rész

The territory’s elections have been postponed, its activists barred from running—police are even targeting them abroad. What next for the democracy movement? We ask whether the global protests about race will affect rampant discrimination in Arab countries, most of which host a minority black population. And the solution to a viniferous mystery that dates back a century and a half. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: August 3rd 2020
24 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: State of the heartland
38 perc 1500. rész

Twice recently an eruption in middle America has shocked the world. Four years ago voters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were decisive in putting Donald Trump in the White House. Two months ago, George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis prompted debate on racism everywhere. 


In a special episode on the Midwest, the region’s role in the 2020 election and America’s future, we hear from Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, her predecessor Rahm Emmanuel, and get the latest from the Economist election forecast.


Charlotte Howard, The Economist's New York bureau chief, hosts with Washington correspondent Jon Fasman and Midwest correspondent Adam Roberts. 


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Living larger: Google’s challenges
22 perc 1500. rész

Enormous growth over 22 years has brought challenges, both from within and from outside; we examine the tech behemoth’s prospects. Wealth has always exploded wherever humans interacted more—and so have epidemics. We look back on the historical links between economic success and hygiene. And Dubai tries to lure tourists for its sweltering summer season. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Edwin Moses
29 perc 1500. rész

How do you become a world-class athlete? Edwin Moses was undefeated in the 400m hurdles for 9 years, 9 months and 9 days and held the world record on four separate occasions. Anne McElvoy asks Moses, the chair of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, if state-sponsored doping can be eradicated, how the pandemic is affecting the Olympic Games and what does protest in sport achieve. Also, how should intersex and trans women compete in sports?


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Barriers to entry: covid-19 and migration
22 perc 1500. rész

The crisis has disproportionately squeezed migrants and has given many leaders an excuse to tighten borders. Will the restrictions outlast the pandemic? Balkan countries were notorious for organised crime in the 1990s—but a new report suggests the next generation of tech-savvy gangsters is even more formidable. And a look at this summer’s clutch of Mars missions.

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Babbage: Life on Mars?
32 perc 1500. rész

Three nations set out on separate missions to shed light on a question that astronomers have been asking for centuries—is there life on Mars? Alok Jha asks leading scientists about how their missions will search for signs of life on the red planet. And, why those investigating it should avoid irreversible damage to a potentially pristine ecosystem.


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One mightily damaging backstory: 1MDB
23 perc 1500. rész

Five years ago a $4.5bn hole in a development fund scrambled Malaysia’s politics. Now the inquiry has claimed its first scalp: that of Najib Razak, a former prime minister. We examine the grand shift of business to “shadow banks”—a more innovative, if less regulated, end of the industry. And we join a mushroom-picking expedition in China’s Yunnan province. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: The age of free money
35 perc 1500. rész

In response to the covid-19 pandemic governments have pumped huge amounts of cash into economies and the role of central banks is changing dramatically. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Henry Curr, The Economist's economics editor, whether this heralds a new era of macroeconomics. Economists Ken Rogoff and Claudia Sahm look at what else policymakers can do—should interest rates go negative? And, banking in the shadows.


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Feds up: Trump orders troops on America’s streets
21 perc 1500. rész

Camouflaged personnel with no insignia, protesters bundled into unmarked vans: the President Donald Trump's plan to put federal officers into American cities is a worrying political ploy. Our annual Big Mac index examines which currencies are over- and undervalued; we take a meaty look at what burgernomics reveals. And Indian scientists simultaneously solve a water problem while taming a fire problem. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The World Ahead: Red, white and green
24 perc 1500. rész

In this climate-themed episode we imagine how the Republican party might pivot on environmental policy and go green for 2024. We consider how climate scientists map out different scenarios for the trajectory of global warming. Also, a journey to 2050 to see how oil companies have reinvented themselves to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. Tom Standage hosts.


Read more from at "The World If" and please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer



 

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Bat out of elsewhere? Tracing SARS-CoV-2’s origins
20 perc 1500. rész

Scientists are looking to South-East Asia to find how the virus got its start in humans. Knowing that could head off future pandemics. It is often hard to blame climate change unequivocally for weather events, but there is no other explanation for this year’s searing Arctic temperatures. And why well-to-do Africans are shopping around for more permissive passports. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: July 27th 2020
28 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the new era of macroeconomics; (9:25) the EU after striking a huge deal; (17:00) and the challenges for Mexico as its youth departs.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Flawed enforcement
39 perc 1500. rész

Plans to abolish the Minneapolis police department after the death of George Floyd are running into opposition, as Jon Fasman reports from the city. Meanwhile, President Trump has promised a surge of federal law enforcement beyond Portland. City commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty says people there will continue to protest the presence of unidentified armed officers. Might this turn into a law-and-order election?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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For old timers’ sake: covid-19 and care homes
22 perc 1500. rész

The pandemic has taken its greatest toll in the world’s nursing homes—but the systemic problems surrounding elderly care long predate covid-19. Economists’ usual barometers have gone topsy-turvy during the crisis, so statisticians are turning to “real-time” data; we ask if these novel measures measure up. And reflecting on the life of America’s civil-rights icon John Lewis.

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The Economist Asks: Hong Kong's future
31 perc 1500. rész

With a sweeping new national-security law, has China won the battle for Hong Kong? Anne McElvoy interviews Regina Ip, a pro-Beijing member of Hong Kong’s cabinet, and Nathan Law, a prominent pro-democracy activist who has fled to the UK. Mrs Ip claims the democratic movement has been hijacked by secessionists and that activists like Mr Law are too young to understand. Mr Law counters that Hong Kong democrats will not give up easily.


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Without a trace: Israel’s covid-19 spike
19 perc 1500. rész

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has gone from boasting about progress to battling protests as the country’s contact-tracing programme has been overwhelmed. Early and extreme seasonal floods in China have already displaced nearly 2m people, raising questions about the country’s grand river-management promises. And the boom in bedtime stories...for adults.

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Babbage: A punt on the Oxford vaccine
24 perc 1500. rész

Oxford University is ahead in the race to develop a covid-19 vaccine that could halt the pandemic. Yet lead researcher, Professor Sarah Gilbert, says some trial results may be delayed owing to changing virus transmissions in different countries. Also, navigating the sky with diamonds. And, why sewage can help census-takers. Kenneth Cukier hosts.

 

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Full-meddle racket: Britain’s “Russia Report”
22 perc 1500. rész

It remains unclear whether influence and misinformation campaigns have had significant effects on Britain’s institutions, or its elections—but only because successive administrations chose not to look. For decades, Myanmar was a heroin supplier to the world; now a methamphetamine-production boom has created a domestic mess, too. And spotting the brightest comet in decades.

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Money Talks: TikTok goes the clock
22 perc 1500. rész

TikTok, a video-sharing app, is caught up in the US-China clash. Can the firm restructure itself to address concerns over privacy and security? Also, why the pandemic has meant some households are awash with cash. And, a question of judgment. Patrick Lane hosts 

 

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Grant them strength, or loan it: Europe’s historic deal
22 perc 1500. rész

After days of gruelling debate, European leaders have agreed a recovery plan. It includes, for the first time, taking on collective debt—to the tune of hundreds of billions of euros. Jihadism has been growing in Africa’s Sahel region; now it’s spilling into neighbouring states. In one of them, Burkina Faso, a charity is helping prisoners break out...into the music business.

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Cheques imbalances: America’s partisan stimulus battle
21 perc 1500. rész

As Congress reconvenes and covid-19 rages largely unabated, the biggest question is how much to prop up the economy—and how to get past partisan rancour about it. With slumping oil prices and a pile of long-term worries, the oil-and-gas industry is looking to offload its dirtiest, most difficult assets. And international polling data suggest that money really can buy happiness.  

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Editor’s Picks: July 20th 2020
23 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Huawei and the tech cold war; (8:55) millions of young minds are going to waste; (16:10) and a new material helps transistors become vanishingly small.

 

 

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Checks and Balance: Out of control
41 perc 1500. rész

The United States is home to the world’s most renowned disease-fighting agency, the CDC. Americans might have expected its scientists to coordinate a testing programme, public health messaging and supplies to keep the pandemic under control. That hasn’t happened. America faces a secondary surge of coronavirus cases not seen anywhere else in the world. Can America beat covid-19?


This episode includes excerpts from CDC Director Dr Robert Redfield’s interview with the Economist Asks podcast.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Laughing all the way: banks’ pandemic windfall
22 perc 1500. rész

Pandemic panic has subsided, and economic pain deferred—so far. But never mind investment banks’ recent triumphs; uncertainty still abounds. Brazil once had a robust “no contact” policy for its isolated indigenous tribes, but missionaries and miners are closing in. And a notorious Sardinian mobster is on the run once again.

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The Economist Asks: Robert Redfield
29 perc 1500. rész

America is experiencing a secondary surge of covid-19 infections unlike anywhere else in the world. Host Anne McElvoy, and The Economist's US editor John Prideaux, ask the director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention how the country can regain control of its epidemic. When one in five Americans report they would refuse to get vaccinated, how big a threat do anti-vaxxers pose to public health? And, when will it be safe to reopen schools?


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No school, hard knocks: developing-world students hit hard
23 perc 1500. rész

For many of the 1.5bn pupils affected by school closures, fewer lessons just means more labour—or worse. That spells a lifetime of lost earnings, and lost childhoods. Executive pay has long been in the spotlight, but the pandemic may at last spur some pay cuts. And why Cartagena, the “pearl of the Caribbean”, doesn’t want its old tourism industry back. 

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Babbage: Something in the air
26 perc 1500. rész

As governments consider loosening lockdowns, troubling evidence suggests that the virus behind covid-19 lingers in the air, making it more communicable than previously thought. Lidia Morawska, of the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health in Queensland, argues for better indoor ventilation. Also, Dr Vivian Lee from Verily, on how she would fix the American healthcare system. And, the “illuminating” technology revealing archaeological secrets. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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Eastern exposure: Russia’s telling protests
22 perc 1500. rész

The arrest of a popular governor in the country’s far east has sparked unrest that reveals President Vladimir Putin’s waning legitimacy—and hints at repression to come. Turkey’s president has turned the stunning Hagia Sophia museum back into a mosque; the distraction tactic is unlikely to work. And why today marks the end of the road for the Segway. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: No Huawei
23 perc 1500. rész

Britain has announced plans to ban Huawei from its 5G networks over security concerns, following pressure from America. How will this change the way Chinese tech firms operate in the West? The row is one sign relations between America and China are going from bad to worse; what does that mean for their trade agreement? And, is a slow bull emerging in China's stockmarkets? Simon Long hosts


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Crude awakening: the Arab world after oil
19 perc 1500. rész

Historic price fluctuations are hastening a post-oil transition that many Arab countries were already contemplating. That could foment plenty of unrest, but also some much-needed reforms. Not many Americans had, until recently, relied on midwifery. Now business is booming—and that has big public-health benefits. And a much-needed update to the old saw that work expands to fill the time available. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Binary choice: a tech cold war looms
21 perc 1500. rész

Tensions between China and America are hastening a global technology-industry split. That is not just inefficient; it will have far-reaching geopolitical implications. Today’s scheduled federal execution in America runs counter to the public’s growing discomfort with the death penalty. And a look back at the composer Ennio Morricone and his most profound working relationship.

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Editor’s Picks: July 13th 2020
22 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how not to tackle American racism, (10:28) a better way to contain Iran’s nuclear programme, (14:38) and the battle for low-earth orbit.


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Checks and Balance: Poor choices
37 perc 1500. rész

Congress must decide whether to extend federal aid for the unemployed beyond July. Ten million more Americans are out of work than in February, but evidence has emerged of falling poverty levels due to the stimulus. Could the coronavirus change the politics of poverty?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Return to centre? Poland’s presidential run-off
21 perc 1500. rész

Integration or isolation? Conservative family values or liberal ones? The knife-edge election will decide Poland’s direction for years, and will send a signal to populist leaders throughout Europe. We examine the long battle against HIV/AIDS and what lessons it holds for dealing with covid-19. And why some penguins like ice less than you might think. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Michaela Coel
30 perc 1500. rész

The creator and star of “I May Destroy You” talks to Anne McElvoy about turning her experience of assault into a new drama probing the grey areas around sexual consent. Coel also opens up about the racist slurs she endured at the prestigious London Guildhall drama school. And, should good TV make people uncomfortable and the secret to the perfect yoga "crow".


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Centrifugal force: attacks on Iran
22 perc 1500. rész

Another strike, evidently on a nuclear-fuel centrifuge facility, is being blamed on Israel—and, by extension, America. It is just the kind of tactic that the abandoned nuclear deal would have obviated. Eastern Europe’s treatment of its drug users runs counter to the “harm-reduction” policies that Europe pioneered decades ago. And faith-based streaming services get a big slice of the pious.

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Babbage: The forgotten pandemic
25 perc 1500. rész

With attention diverted to covid-19, access to HIV medications has been disrupted. Host Kenneth Cukier talks to Meg Doherty, director of HIV programmes at the World Health Organisation, about the fight against the other pandemic. Also, hydrogen power has had many false starts. Could it be about to take off? And, scientist Ainissa Ramirez on the ways technology changes how people live, act, and think. 

 


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In front, and centred: Joe Biden
22 perc 1500. rész

The former vice-president has shifted leftward with his party, but it is his centrist tendencies that make him electable—and could permit him to effect radical change. Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, is reshuffling the government; why has he chosen a largely unknown mayor as the new prime minister? And the rhymes and reasons behind rap music’s surge in the Arab world. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Money Talks: In recovery?
22 perc 1500. rész

As some lockdown measures lift, governments hope they can get their economies back on track. Which will have the strongest recovery? Also, meal-delivery wars heat up as Uber gobbles up rival Postmates in an all-stock deal worth over $2.6bn. And, the importance of building a more resilient food-supply chain. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


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____________________



 

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Off like a shot: the race for a covid-19 vaccine
21 perc 1500. rész

A British team is leading the race for the one innovation that could, in time, halt the coronavirus crisis. But once a vaccine is approved, who would get it, where, and how fast? An Ethiopian musician’s murder has inflamed the ethnic tensions that threaten the country’s transition to democracy. And a rollicking tale of sloppy spycraft in Fiji.

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Attention deficit: China’s campaign against Uighurs
23 perc 1500. rész

Unparalleled surveillance, forced labour, even allegations of ethnic cleansing: atrocities in Xinjiang province carry on. Why are governments and businesses so loth to protest? The field of economics is, at last, facing up to its long-standing race problem. And how covid-19 is scrambling Scandinavians’ stereotypes about one another.

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Editor’s Picks: July 6th 2020
28 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Joe Biden: Retro or radical? (9:34), the world is not experiencing a second wave of covid-19—it never got over the first (15:25), and a phoney referendum shows that Putin’s legitimacy is fading.

 

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Checks and Balance: Monuments men
41 perc 1500. rész

President Trump is celebrating July 4th with four revered forerunners at Mount Rushmore. Anti-racist protests have brought down dozens of smaller monuments in the past month. The president says the left wants to “vandalise our history.” But Americans have never felt less proud of their national identity, according to Gallup. What is the political impact of this national soul-searching? 


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Into left field? America's chief justice
23 perc 1500. rész

Recent Supreme Court rulings might seem like a leftward shift. But Chief Justice John Roberts is leaving loopholes for future conservative challenges. China’s video-sharing social network TikTok was wildly popular in India, until the government pulled the plug this week. And why high-end Bordeaux wines are so (relatively) cheap.

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The Economist Asks: David Malpass
28 perc 1500. rész

The Economist Asks: David Malpass

The president of the World Bank talks to host Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, our economics editor, about how to stop covid-19 undoing decades of progress on global poverty. A veteran of the Trump and Reagan administrations, David Malpass argues that the private sector needs to step up. And what role should China play, as the biggest lender to most of the world’s poorest countries—is it guilty of “debt-trap diplomacy”?


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Unsettled question: Israel’s annexation threat
22 perc 1500. rész

A once-fringe position on annexing the West Bank is now a real prospect. But both international support and opposition are lukewarm; not even Israelis think it a priority. For years, war-crimes allegations hung over Kosovo’s president. Now a court has weighed in—undercutting long-running territorial talks with Serbia. And why flashy homes in Sierra Leone’s capital are taxed the same as tin-roofed shacks.

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Babbage: Predicting pandemics
24 perc 1500. rész

As covid-19 continues to devastate the world and scientists race to develop therapeutics and vaccines, Alok Jha investigates how to get ahead of the curve and prevent the next pandemic. Scientists explain how studying the relationship between animals and humans, and finding and genetically sequencing the millions of as-yet-undiscovered animal viruses in the wild, could stop future disease outbreaks becoming global health catastrophes. 



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Two systems go: a new law grips Hong Kong
22 perc 1500. rész

A sweeping new national-security law deeply undermines Beijing’s “one country, two systems” approach in the territory; under it, arrests have already been made. What next for Hong Kong’s activists and its businesses? Malawi’s overturned election is a ray of hope that democracy can survive both incumbents’ strongman tactics and covid-19. And the varied successes of pro- and anti-Trump tell-all books. 

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Money Talks: Unfriending Facebook
23 perc 1500. rész

Companies including Unilever, Coca-Cola and Verizon are pulling their ads from Facebook because of its content-moderation policies. Does this spell trouble for the social-media giant? Also, why investors’ love of commercial property is being tested. And, e-sports v traditional sports. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


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The next threat: confronting global risks
25 perc 1500. rész

Six months on from the first reports of the coronavirus, this special episode examines the catastrophic and even existential risks to civilisation. Work is already under way to head off future pandemics, but how to prepare—and who can take on preparing—for the gravest threats with the longest odds?

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The World Ahead: Bus to the future
28 perc 1500. rész

What is the future of public transport in the wake of the covid-19 pandemic? Also, the United Nations’ Assistant Secretary-General on how countries should prepare for future disasters. And could a “carbon surveillance” system help save the planet? Tom Standage hosts

 

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States of alarm: America’s covid-19 surge
21 perc 1500. rész

An entirely predictable pattern is playing out: the states quickest to exit lockdowns are being hit hardest. Can the country get the virus reliably under control? The pandemic has led to staggering amounts of excess plastic waste, now washing up on shores near you. And the growing risks to South Korea’s tradition of bullfighting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: June 29th 2020
27 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the next catastrophe and how to survive it; (9:40) the risks of annexation for Israel; (21:50) and the Wirecard scandal.

 

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Checks and Balance: Bias beware
39 perc 1500. rész

Impartiality in political journalism is under scrutiny as never before. President Trump took a trademark pop at the “fakers” when he resumed his campaign rallies in Tulsa. Meanwhile the White House has begun decapitating state-funded global news agencies like Voice of America. Can fair-minded reporting survive hyper-partisan politics?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Council insecurity: the UN at 75
23 perc 1500. rész

The founders of the United Nations expected it would move with the times. It hasn’t. Can reforms keep all those nations united? The global focus on policing following George Floyd’s death has sparked a reckoning for television shows that distort Americans’ views of cops. And with this weekend’s Glastonbury festival long since postponed, we ask how live music will survive the pandemic. 

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The Economist Asks: António Guterres
29 perc 1500. rész

Seventy-five years after the foundation of the United Nations, host Anne McElvoy and Daniel Franklin, The Economist’s diplomatic editor, ask Secretary-General Guterres whether the organisation still works. The dysfunctional relationship between its three dominant powers, America, China and Russia, has dangerous consequences—does the UN need to reinvent itself to work with them? And could the WHO’s relationship with China have undermined its efforts to stop the spread of the coronavirus?


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Rush to a conclusion: Latin America’s lockdowns
22 perc 1500. rész

After scattershot enforcement of lockdowns, the region has become the pandemic’s new focal point. But many countries are opening up anyway. America’s latest choke on immigration is aligned with the president’s politics—but not with the tech industry’s needs. And southern France faces a tourist season sans tourists.

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Babbage: Track and trace
33 perc 1500. rész

Contact tracing is one of the tools being used against covid-19, but in the age of the smartphone, technology presents a new way to improve the process. Kenneth Cukier explores why contact-tracing apps have not yet delivered on their promise, how they can preserve privacy and what today’s decisions mean for the future of technology in society.  


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Leave in peace: Afghan-Taliban negotiations
20 perc 1500. rész

A withdrawal agreement struck with America has been damnably hard to implement, but the two sides may at last start talks to crimp nearly two decades of conflict. Wirecard, once the darling of Germany’s financial-technology scene, is now at the centre of a massive scandal—and plenty saw it coming. And big wins by national football teams in Africa help ease internecine violence.

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Money Talks: Can Amazon still deliver?
34 perc 1500. rész

The coronavirus has turned Amazon into one of the world’s essential firms. But while proving the company’s strengths, the pandemic-fuelled digital surge has also revealed its vulnerabilities. Tamzin Booth, The Economist’s technology and business editor, talks to insiders, critics and the competition, to find out whether Amazon can carry on dominating e-commerce and triumph in the coming cloud wars. 


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Past its Prime? Amazon comes of age
24 perc 1500. rész

The pandemic has been great for sales; for profits, not so much. We examine the e-commerce giant’s prospects as it adapts to a changing world. Throughout history pandemics have helped to shape human conflicts, and covid-19 is no different. And reflecting on the life of an Amazonian storyteller, medicine man and unlikely film star.

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Isle be damned: Britain ravaged by covid-19
20 perc 1500. rész

Cosmopolitan, overweight, multi-ethnic: the country’s makeup has made the pandemic more deadly. But the government has repeatedly played a bad hand badly. Native American communities are being hit hard, too, putting tribal customs and even languages at risk. And why China’s company seals hold such power—and potential for abuse.

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Editor’s Picks: June 22nd 2020
26 perc 1500. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Amazon is essential, but vulnerable; (10:35) pandemic politics in Britain; (18:15) and the United Nations after 75 years.

 

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Checks and Balance: Generals strike
39 perc 1500. rész

America is in the midst of its worst civil-military crisis for a generation. President Trump’s call to use military force to quell protests caused alarm up and down the chain of command. What is the place of the military in political life? We speak to Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Republican Congressman Mike Gallagher, an Iraq veteran.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Syria’s condition: Bashar al-Assad
22 perc 1500. rész

The country’s dictator has spent nearly half his time in power waging war on his own people. His patchwork support network is fading, but he will not go easily. America’s racial unrest has put reparations back in the national conversation—but how best to pay slaves’ descendants, and how much? And the antiquated etiquette lessons required of South Asia’s civil servants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


 

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The Economist Asks: Mellody Hobson
27 perc 1500. rész

How can business be braver on race? Anne McElvoy asks Mellody Hobson, co-CEO of Ariel Investments, whether investors should divest from companies that don’t do enough to address racial inequality. Hobson also explains the challenges of managing diverse views, in particular when it comes to investing in the tobacco industry. And, what does she learn from Lenin?


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Painting the red towns: covid-19 in America
21 perc 1500. rész

Coronavirus cases are easing in Democrat-held jurisdictions and rising in Republican-held areas. What is behind the shift, and what will it mean for President Donald Trump? Ireland at last has a coalition-government plan—upending a nearly century-old rivalry in order to keep the Irish-nationalist party Sinn Fein out of power. And a nine-year-old hopes to become the world’s youngest-ever chess grandmaster.

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Babbage: Pole position
25 perc 1500. rész

A year-long, $160m expedition to the Arctic has passed its halfway mark and is amassing sobering data about the effects of climate change there. One of the scientists on board explains the discoveries so far. Also, Peter Schwartz, who imagined the future in Minority Report, shares his advice for forward planning in the age of covid-19. And, what next for facial recognition technology?


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Himalayan assault: India and China clash
20 perc 1500. rész

The first deaths at the contested border in 45 years signal broader geopolitical shifts—and mark an escalation that will be difficult to reverse. “Mercenary” is less and less a dirty word in Africa; in fact, there may be more of them than ever before. And how the art business increasingly relies on marketing the dead.

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Money Talks: What USA Inc can do about racial injustice
22 perc 1500. rész

The killing of George Floyd and ensuing protests are a wake-up call for corporate America. There are few African-Americans among its CEOs. What will bosses do to combat racism beyond releasing PR statements? Also, how diversity helps the bottom line and the history of economic suppression of African-Americans. Patrick Lane hosts.


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No port in a storm: the world’s stranded sailors
21 perc 1500. rész

Pandemic policies seem to have overlooked the key workers who keep the global trade system afloat: merchant seamen. More than a quarter of a million are at sea unwillingly. Misinformation was a plague even before covid-19. Now it’s a matter of life and death—and of political persuasion. And why pedigree puppies are so pricey in Britain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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A shifting alliance: NATO
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As the organisation’s defence ministers meet this week we look at two of its principal challenges: China’s rising influence and America’s declining interest. After more than three decades, a grand murder mystery has been solved in Sweden—but the outcome has many more frustrated than before. And why there is a matchmaking boom in Japan. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Editor's Picks: June 15th 2020
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the power of protest and the legacy of George Floyd; (11:07) life in great cities after the pandemic; (17:55) and the lessons from one hundred Bartleby columns on work and management.

 

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Checks and Balance: Modelled citizens
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Forecasters put Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning at 70 percent or more on the eve of the election in 2016. She was also the favourite to carry key states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin that Donald Trump won on the night. This week The Economist data team launches its 2020 presidential election forecast. How useful are models at a time when politics can seem so out of control?


We speak to Elliott Morris, data journalist for The Economist, and pollster Cornell Belcher.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Heavy lifting: India’s lockdown tradeoffs
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As the world’s largest lockdown loosens, we examine how it went wrong and the challenges ahead for a health-care system pushed to its limits. As statues fall across the globe our culture correspondent considers how they represent shifting values and hierarchies—and when they should go. And economists weigh in once again on the phenomenon of winning streaks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Jeffrey Sachs
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The seismic shock of the coronavirus pandemic has revealed the fragility of an interconnected world. Anne McElvoy and economist Jeffrey Sachs debate whether globalisation is still worth the risks—and whether liberal economists should bear some of the blame. And could the end of American leadership on the world stage help President Donald Trump’s re-election effort?


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Spend, sometime: Germany’s economic shift
21 perc 1494. rész

After decades as the continent’s penny-pincher, the country seems to be splashing out. That isn’t just a covid-19 response; a big thrift shift was already under way. Burundi’s brutal outgoing president of 15 years has died. Will his chosen successor be any better? And after some serious number-crunching, The Economist launches its US presidential forecast.

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Babbage: Covid-19's path of destruction
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Slavea Chankova and Kenneth Cukier investigate the ways in which SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes covid-19, wears the body down. Apart from pneumonia, there are other facets to the disease that are less understood such as damage to the kidneys, blood vessels and heart. And, how does covid-19 continue to harm the body—and patients' mental health— in the long term?


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Haftar be going now: the balance shifts in Libya
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Tripoli has long been under siege by Khalifa Haftar, a warlord bent on toppling the internationally backed government. At last he has been pushed back from the capital; now what? North Korea is no longer taking calls from the South, but that is probably a diplomatic distraction from big problems at home. And how Ikea is assembling its post-covid future. 

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Money Talks: Joblessness in May
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American unemployment fell in May, but is this really a sign of a "rocket-ship" recovery? Also, Gene Sperling, a former director of the National Economic Council, lays out his vision for a more equitable society. And, thriving on secrecy—the private fund behind well-known brands. Simon Long hosts.


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Cops, a plea: police reform in America
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George Floyd will be laid to rest today; our obituaries editor reflects on his life and untimely death. His murder has fuelled a long-overdue discussion of America’s fragmented and unaccountable police forces. How much could yesterday’s sweeping congressional bill actually fix? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Say his name, and others’: American protests spread globally
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Far beyond America’s shores demonstrators are calling for justice in their own countries. It’s an awkward time for America’s allies, and a fortuitous one for its rivals. Labour-market swings during recessions are normally a measure of male employees’ moves—but not this time. And why the video-games industry is raiding its own back catalogue.

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Editor’s Picks: June 8th 2020
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Police violence, race and protest in America, How will China’s Belt and Road Initiative survive? (10:30) And, Alexander Pushkin’s productive lockdown (23:10).

 

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Checks and balance: Fair cops
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America is engulfed in its most widespread, sustained unrest since the late 1960s. It was sparked by an act of police brutality caught on camera. In the days since, Americans have seen police forces look more like an invading army than public servants sworn to protect their fellow citizens. Who will the politics of police versus protestors favour in 2020?


We speak to Janeé Harteau, a former Minneapolis police chief, historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad, and Mitch Colvin, Mayor of Fayetteville, North Carolina.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. 


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Not everything in moderation: Twitter v Facebook
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The seemingly similar social networks have quite different business models—and that goes some way in explaining why they choose to police their content differently. Emmanuel Macron again finds himself changing course after members of his party defect. And move over, doctors: literature by nurses is at last hitting bookshelves.

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The Economist Asks: Valerie Jarrett
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Valerie Jarrett was President Obama's longest serving senior adviser, with responsibility for criminal justice and police reform. In the wake of the killing of George Floyd and protests across the country, Anne McElvoy asks whether this moment could be a turning point on racial equality in America and which changes to policing would have the most effect. Also, how does the outcry affect President Trump’s chances of reelection—and how does she assess Joe Biden's record on race?

 

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This, too, shall impasse: Brexit talks resume
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The pandemic has made negotiations more difficult and changed the political calculus on both sides. Prospects for a deal before year’s end are dimming. After more than two decades on the lam, an alleged architect of Rwanda’s 1994 genocide is headed to court. And how archaeologists use “soundscapes” and replica instruments to examine past civilisations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Babbage: The rise of robo-doc
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Doctors enter augmented reality to help them treat patients with illnesses like covid-19. Host Kenneth Cukier speaks to the doctors leading a Hololens initiative at an Imperial College London hospital. Also, Dario Gil, director of IBM Research, on the future of scientific collaboration. And SpaceX has successfully sent two astronauts to the International Space Station—what’s next for commercial spaceflight? 


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Forgoing the distance: covid-19 spreads in Brazil
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Even those who can distance themselves are unsure whether to do so—in part because President Jair Bolsonaro mocks the science and rails against lockdowns. The private-equity industry has ballooned since the last financial crisis; does that make it weaker or stronger in this one? And our correspondent investigates a Mexican-mummy mystery. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Money Talks: Hong Kong, gone wrong?
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China and America are clashing over Hong Kong. Can the multi-trillion-dollar financial centre survive the fall out? Also, property developer Hamid Moghadam explains why the rise of e-commerce has made warehouses hot property. And the lockdown has led to a bicycle boom—will it last? Patrick Lane hosts 


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An epidemic of hunger: covid-19 and poverty
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The pandemic is driving up the number of impoverished people for the first time in more than two decades. Lockdown-policy calculations are simply different in the poor world. The ill effects of China’s hydropower boom are trickling down to the tens of millions who depend on the Mekong River. And a meditation on the merits of reading others’ diaries. Additional audio from 'caquet' at Freesound.org. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The flames spread: protests in America
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Demonstrations against police violence have only amplified. We ask why George Floyd’s death touched a nerve, and why these events keep happening in America. A look at the country’s cyber-defences reveals considerable weaknesses—what are states to do as electronic attacks outpace the conventional kind? And what museums are doing now to document the history unfolding around them.

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Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30).


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.

 

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Checks and Balance: The American way
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America has passed a grim milestone: 100,000 deaths from covid-19. Many Americans think the country has been hit uniquely hard and that the president’s bungled response is to blame. That view is not borne out by international comparisons. But, as all 50 states reopen with the virus still prevalent, Americans are right to be nervous. How will America’s efforts to recover impact the presidential race?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon and Henry Curr, our economics editor, also join.


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Crying foul, again: Black Lives Matter
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Protests have broken out in Minneapolis and far beyond, following another black man’s death at the hands of a white policeman. Can the once-mighty Black Lives Matter make itself heard? The pandemic may threaten London’s place as Britain’s undisputed centre of gravity. And a researcher spooks spooks by revealing a decades-old spy pact. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Marcus Samuelsson
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America’s independent restaurants face a future in which half their tables stand empty. Anne McElvoy asks award-winning chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson how restaurants can reinvent their business models to survive. They talk about converting chic eateries into community kitchens in the covid-19 crisis and why he thinks Joe Biden deserves a chance. Also, what does Mr Samuelsson make of racial tensions following the fatal police brutality case in Minnesota? And he takes Anne McElvoy on a culinary tour from chicken stew in his native Ethiopia via Swedish lingonberry vodka to red-velvet cake in Harlem.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Checking their privilege: Beijing’s threat to Hong Kong
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China’s parliament voted today to draft legislation that would utterly undermine the territory’s independence. What now for protesters, for Western powers, for the region’s foreign firms? The pandemic has quashed some crimes but has also created new nefarious opportunities. And it may be closing time for the golden age of the booze business.

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Babbage: The language of the universe
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How can mathematics help us understand our lives and predict the world around us? Host Alok Jha speaks to David Sumpter of Uppsala University about the equations that can help people make better decisions. Christl Donnelly, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London details the role mathematics plays in modelling covid-19. Moon Duchin of Tufts University explains how maths can stop gerrymandering. And physicist Graham Farmelo on why he thinks the universe speaks in numbers. 


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Leading nowhere: assessing Trump’s covid-19 response
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President Donald Trump’s failures of leadership have compounded the crisis. But America’s health-care and preparedness systems have problems that predate him. South Korea marks the 40th anniversary of a massacre that remains politically divisive even now. And, today’s space-launch plan in America blazes a trail for a new, commercial space industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Money Talks: We’re not going on a summer holiday
21 perc 1494. rész

Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery?  

 

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Shot chasers: big pharma’s covid-19 boost
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The pandemic has caused a shift in how drug firms are viewed: their capacity for big-money innovation will give them immunity in the crisis. Widespread homeworking will have broad consequences, from commercial-property values to urban demographics. And a seemingly innocuous Hong Kong history exam is a window into the territory’s increasingly fraught politics. 

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The World Ahead: After Kim Jong-un
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The North Korean leader’s recent disappearance for three weeks led to intense speculation about his health. What would happen if Mr Kim's regime collapsed? Peter Singer, an author and political scientist, explains how his novel, set in the near future, is helping policymakers respond to artificial intelligence. And how feasible is wireless charging for electric cars? Tom Standage hosts



 

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Clear skies with a chance: covid-19’s green opportunity
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Emissions have plummeted as the pandemic slowed the world. It could be a mere blip—but it is an unprecedented opportunity for a greener, more sustainable economy. Serving in America’s armed forces is a long-established path to citizenship, but that path is narrowing. And we ask how sport will emerge from the pandemic, even if the stands stay empty. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Editor’s Picks: May 25th 2020
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25). 

 

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Checks and Balance: Fab phwoar
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Taiwanese firm TSMC plans to build a new fab, or computer chip factory, in Arizona. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the $12bn investment a boost for American “economic independence” amid China’s creeping dominance in tech. A geopolitical tug-of-war is being fought over nanoscopic wafers of silicon. What do microchips tell us about what’s happening to globalisation? And, as the coronavirus stokes anti-China sentiment, will trade barriers remain no matter who wins November’s election?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Asia technology correspondent Hal Hodson and Soumaya Keynes, trade editor, also join.


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Systemic concerns: China’s party congress
23 perc 1488. rész

Legislation signalled at the annual meeting undermines the “one country, two systems” approach to Hong Kong’s rule—and may inflame rather than quell protests. Argentina finds itself at the doorstep of default once again; the pandemic is sharpening the hardship ahead. And remembering the woman who expanded Irish poetry with the gloriously quotidian. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The Economist Asks: David Simon
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The writer of “The Wire” and “The Deuce” takes a break from the dark side of real life to explore an alternative history in which Franklin D Roosevelt lost the 1940 presidential election to an anti-Semitic isolationist—on a platform to lead America towards fascism. As the country prepares for a very different election, Anne McElvoy asks David Simon about the roots of anti-immigrant feeling in America and whether individuals can change the course of history. Plus, when does a storyteller need to learn to let go? And they swap lockdown binge-watching favourites from the streaming archives.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Swimming against the currency: Turkey
18 perc 1486. rész

A central bank struggling for independence, dwindling foreign reserves to prop up the currency and a president who just hates rates: Turkey’s economy looked shaky even before covid-19. Online dating carries on apace amid lockdowns, and it seems people are forging more emotionally intimate bonds. And the risk that humans might pass the coronavirus to their primate cousins.

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Babbage: Think of the children
23 perc 1485. rész

An apparent spike in a rare childhood illness, Kawasaki disease, suggests the coronavirus may manifest very differently in children and raises questions over the role they play in spreading the pandemic. America’s latest offensive against Huawei pushes the global semiconductor industry into uncharted territory; it may also harm American interests in the process. And, flattening the other curve—could fossil fuels be added to covid-19’s casualty list? Kenneth Cukier hosts


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Politics trumps co-operation: the WHO’s annual meeting
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Rhetoric and posturing at the World Health Organisation’s annual assembly reveal an agency under geopolitical stresses just when global co-operation is needed most. Illegal logging has become an existential threat for the Amazon; under the cover of covid-19, a new bill in Brazil could hasten its decline. And reflections on the vast musical legacy of Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider.

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Money Talks: Eye of the hurricane
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America and Europe face a wave of corporate bankruptcies as a result of covid-19. But will some businesses be able to restructure rather than go broke? Also, why some are calling for the Federal Reserve to turn to negative interest rates to alleviate the slump. And, is now the time for entrepreneurial true grit? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 


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Extreme measures: America’s far right
21 perc 1482. rész

Extremists are cropping up at protests and expanding their reach online. They see the pandemic as proof of their worldview, and as an opportunity to spread their messages. After systematically ignoring mental-health concerns for decades, China’s authorities are at last tackling the issue—somewhat. And lockdowns prove that Britain is a nation of gardeners. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Carriers and the disease: the airlines set for hard landings
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Which firms will fly above the covid-19 clouds? Big, low-cost carriers with strong finances seem likeliest, but either way consolidation is inevitable. The Indian state of Kerala seems to be handling its outbreak far better than others; blame an unassuming but wildly popular health minister. And whether New York’s beloved Irish pubs will craic on past the pandemic.

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Editor’s Picks: May 18th 2020
26 perc 1480. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, has covid-19 killed globalisation? Why the European Union is having a bad crisis (10:55) and how Mike Pompeo is confusing leadership with bashing his opponents (19:20). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts.

 

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Checks and Balance: Law law land
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A row over the president’s tax returns has arrived in the Supreme Court. Donald Trump is challenging subpoenas that seek to disclose his finances. The court’s power over the presidency is being tested while the justices face the frustrations of remote working. How might the Supreme Court affect the election?


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Steven Mazie, the Economist’s Supreme Court correspondent, and legal historian Mary Ziegler also join.


Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus.


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Continental divides: covid-19 strains the EU
21 perc 1478. rész

What started as a public-health crisis is developing into an existential one. The most fundamental question to be addressed is: what is the European Union for? Hopes of helpful change by El Salvador’s millennial president are dimming as he becomes increasingly dictatorial. And why so many Indonesians are draping themselves in the sun.

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The Economist Asks: Dan Crenshaw
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Liberty is curtailed around the world during the global pandemic. With the costs of lockdown mounting, Americans are divided over how far and how fast to reopen. Anne McElvoy asks Dan Crenshaw, a rising star in the Republican ranks in Congress, whether the coronavirus is forcing conservatives to embrace a new era of big government. As his own state of Texas eases restrictions, the congressman argues Americans are ready to accept the risks. Plus, is a post-oil future possible for the Lone-Star State? And why, though born in Scotland, he could still have the White House in his sights. 


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.

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Bibi steps: Israel’s long-awaited government
20 perc 1476. rész

After three elections and 16 months, the unity government between sworn rivals Binyamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz gets to work tonight. Can it withstand the coming political storms? Frenetic research into the coronavirus is upending some long-established ways of disseminating science, perhaps for good. And we examine the merits of outlawing an awkward job interview question. 

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Editor's note: After publication, the swearing in of Israel's new government was postponed until Sunday.

 

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Babbage: Is there anybody out there?
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Will humans ever discover intelligent life in space? Since the 1960’s, scientists have been working on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. They have not found it yet but their research is moving up a gear. Better telescopes, faster computers and more funding means that the chances of discovering ET in the next few decades have dramatically increased. Alok Jha hosts.


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Fool Britannia? A covid-19 response under scrutiny
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After a series of government missteps, people in Britain—and, increasingly, outside it—are lambasting the covid-19 response. That has great reputational costs. In a story suited to a television drama, a Filipino network popular with the people but critical of the president has been forced off the air. And our columnist finds surprising modern resonance in a 1950s Argentinian novel. 

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Money Talks: How to keep feeding the world
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The global food network has so far weathered the challenge of covid-19 and largely kept shelves and plates full. As the pandemic continues, more people are at risk of going hungry. But unlike past crises, the problem this time will not be supply. Rachana Shanbhogue and Matthieu Favas trace an $8trn food chain back from fork to farm to investigate the weak links. Can governments hold their nerve and resist protectionism? And could the crisis reveal an opportunity for a greener food future?


Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus.

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Moveable feast: a global food system adapts
21 perc 1472. rész

The vast network moving food from farm to fork has shifted gears mightily in response to covid-19. But some will still go hungry; governments must resist the urge to crimp exports. Inflation statistics are often tallied in store aisles and at restaurant tables; how to gather those data now? And why being a warm-up act is cold comfort for many bands. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Back to the furore: protests set to reignite
21 perc 1471. rész

The pandemic overshadowed a striking spate of uprisings around the world. In Lebanon economic conditions have only worsened since—and the protesters are back. A look at urban architecture reveals how past diseases have shaped the world’s cities; we ask how much covid-19 will leave its mark. And, can Corona beer, Latin America’s first global brand, escape its associations with the coronavirus?  

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Editor’s Picks: May 11th 2020
29 perc 1470. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the dangerous gap between Wall Street and Main Street in America, (10:22) high-speed science—new research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent. (21:00) And, casual sex is out, companionship is in.

 

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Checks and Balance: University challenge
37 perc 1469. rész

Amid the lockdown some American students have filed lawsuits to get refunds on their tuition fees. Shifting classes online has rekindled concerns about the high cost of college education. Last year an FBI investigation exposed wealthy parents paying to cheat elite university admissions. The perception that university is no longer a driver of social mobility - but the opposite - fuels the political divide. How true is that?


In this episode US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon reports on a scheme that helps poor students complete college, we unpick the complicated history of American meritocracy, and hear from the frontline of the admissions process.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman.


Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus.


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Rises and false: markets v the economy
22 perc 1468. rész

How can stockmarkets be so healthy when many businesses are so unwell? We look at the many risks that are clearly not priced in. China’s documentary-makers are having to find clever ways to get past censors—which is why one famed filmmaker is just giving his work away online. And remembering a legendary rock-climber who always wanted to find a new way up.

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The Economist Asks: General Sir Nick Carter
32 perc 1467. rész

Seventy-five years after the end of the second world war in Europe, armed forces around the world have been mobilised to fight a new common enemy. Anne McElvoy asks General Sir Nick Carter, Britain's chief of the defence staff, what lessons past wars hold for conquering the coronavirus. He explains the work of the secretive 77 Brigade in fighting disinformation and his view on rumours about the origins of the coronavirus. Plus, why neither NATO nor Russia is "taking its foot off the gas” during the pandemic. And, how he will be commemorating VE Day virtually.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Hitting a Vlad patch: 20 years of Putin
20 perc 1466. rész

As Russia’s leader marks two decades in power, he faces almighty headwinds—not only covid-19 but also cut-price oil and an increasingly leery citizenry. The pandemic is hitting different tech firms in different ways but on balance it seems to be further consolidating the power of the big ones. And the surprisingly upbeat music that comes about during downturns.

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Babbage: Shot at victory
24 perc 1465. rész

Could repurposing existing drugs, such as remdesivir, be the answer to the search for treatments for covid-19? Also, the winner of this year’s Marconi Prize, Andrea Goldsmith of Stanford University, on her pioneering work in wireless communications technology. And, the mission to give rivers their wiggle back. Kenneth Cukier hosts. 


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Disarming revelation: a chance at a global ceasefire
21 perc 1464. rész

Many were shocked when armed groups heeded a call for a global ceasefire; given a squabble at the UN it would now be shocking if those pockets of peace continue to hold. We examine a century-old technique as a possible treatment for covid-19. And a family feud involving Britain’s most-reclusive octogenarians heads to court. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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Money Talks: Judgement day for the ECB
25 perc 1463. rész

Germany’s constitutional court has given the European Central Bank an ultimatum. The ruling could prompt further challenges to both the EU’s economic recovery plan and the authority of its highest court. The pandemic is a moment of reckoning for America’s health-care industry; but could patients ultimately benefit? And host Patrick Lane gets a glimpse of the—contactless—office of the future.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.

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Degrees of separation: universities and covid-19
20 perc 1462. rész

Many universities were on thin ice financially before the pandemic. Now, with foreign travel slumping and distancing measures the norm, a global reckoning is coming. In many Asian countries, Ramadan seems largely untouched by pandemic-protection measures; we ask why. And the vexing question of how many people live in North Macedonia.

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Lives v livelihoods: Africa’s covid-19 tradeoffs
20 perc 1461. rész

As Nigeria tentatively lifts its lockdown today, we examine the decisions African leaders face: pandemic policies may do more harm than the pandemic itself. There’s a curious dearth of smokers among covid-19’s most severe cases; that may point to a treatment. And on its 150th anniversary, a reflection on the history and the mission of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

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Editor’s Picks: May 4th 2020
32 perc 1460. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a 90% economy—life after lockdowns will be hard in ways that are difficult to imagine today. Also, a bust-up in Brasilia (10:10), and solitude is both a blessing and a curse (17:25).

 

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Checks and Balance: Apocalypse Now
36 perc 1459. rész

The pandemic has been grim for admirers of America's preeminence. The country that rallied allies to defend democracy and lead the world in scientific endeavour has been hit hardest by the coronavirus. China has sent medical supplies to American states, while the president brainstorms unlikely cures on live TV. Is America ceding global leadership? Maybe. One certainty is that fretting over the demise of the Republic is a longstanding American tradition. 


In this episode we trace the origins of declinism in modern American politics and hear from someone who spent years preparing for societal breakdown, only for those plans themselves to unravel.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman.


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Nature, or nurtured? A politicised virus-origin hunt
22 perc 1458. rész

Scientists may soon understand how the new coronavirus got its start; that could help head off future outbreaks. In the meantime, politicians are clouding the discussion. America and Europe are taking different approaches to keeping small businesses afloat, but it’s a struggle on both sides of the Atlantic. And tuning in to the global boom in community radio stations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Shakespeare in America
21 perc 1457. rész

In a year of plagues, power struggles and star-crossed lovers divided by lockdown, Anne McElvoy asks James Shapiro, author of “Shakespeare in a Divided America”, what the bard would make of it all. Shakespeare is claimed by Americans of all political stripes. But how can a lad from 16th-century Stratford-upon-Avon illuminate the past and future of the republic now? Plus, what the president might teach the professor about Shakespeare’s work. And, Shapiro prescribes a verse for the trials and tribulations of 2020.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Submerging markets: developing economies and covid-19
20 perc 1456. rész

The pandemic is hitting emerging markets particularly hard, and the crisis is likely to widen the gap between the strongest and the weakest among them. Physical distancing is making life even harder for people with dementia, and their carers. And a few tips on learning a new language in lockdown.

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Babbage: Beyond immunity
23 perc 1455. rész

The immune system plays a vital role in protecting humans from infections, but how is it faring against covid-19? Pascal Soriot, chief executive of the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, tells host, Kenneth Cukier, about potential treatments for covid patients. Plus, do people build up an immunity to covid-19 if they have recovered from it, or can they catch it again? And, Sonja Lyubomirsky, professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, on how acts of kindness can boost the immune system.


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Those who can, teach! The case for reopening schools
20 perc 1454. rész

The world’s students are falling behind and lockdown is only exacerbating prior disparities in their progress; we examine a compelling back-to-school argument. America’s Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back yet more pollution protections, but who stands to gain is unclear. And why so many urban Kenyans understate their salaries to the villagers back home.

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Money Talks: Peak car?
25 perc 1453. rész

Lockdowns worldwide have brought the automobile industry to a standstill. Hakan Samuelsson, the CEO of Volvo, explains why the solution to the crisis will not be as simple as getting factories moving again. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Simon Wright, industry editor, and Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor, whether carmakers can still afford to invest in the cutting-edge technologies that could transport them to a greener, safer future. Has the world passed peak car?


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First, pass the post: Ohio’s vote-by-mail experiment
22 perc 1452. rész

The state’s all-postal primaries vote could be seen as a trial run for November’s presidential election. Might voting by mail be the least-bad option? The BBC’s canny response to covid-19 has quietened its critics, but bigger problems await after the pandemic. And how a few once-feuding families are pushing Bolivian wine onto the world stage. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The World Ahead: Viral acceleration
24 perc 1451. rész

The covid-19 pandemic has triggered an economic crisis, but how will this change the way people use technology—and which of these changes will last? Host Tom Standage speaks to guests from Ark Invest, the Brookings Institution and Alphabet’s drone-delivery company, Wing, to explore which technologies stand to benefit from an acceleration in the pace of adoption.


 

 Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)

 

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End transmission: covid-19 in New Zealand
20 perc 1450. rész

The country is aiming for complete elimination of the coronavirus; so far, so good. But renewed freedom within its borders requires that virtually no one cross them. Restrictions in Europe on movement of agricultural labour could leave crops to rot in the fields. And why cologne is the hand-sanitiser of choice in Turkey.

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Editor's Picks: April 27th 2020
24 perc 1449. rész

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how will governments cope with the expensive legacy of covid-19? (11:05), unscrupulous autocrats in the pandemic of power grabs (17:52), and, why Netflix’s success will continue. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts.

 

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Checks and Balance: Corona corralled?
35 perc 1448. rész

"We can corral the coronavirus," Gov. Greg Abbott said, announcing his plan to reopen the Texas economy. Floridians have returned to the beaches and other Southern states are starting to relax restrictions on restaurants, gyms and hair salons. But public support for maintaining the lockdown remains strong. Can America reopen while keeping covid-19 at bay?


In this episode we hear how Wisconsinites view the lockdown and a Bronx medic tells us what it’s like on the frontline. We also find out where ending social distancing might be most risky.


John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman.


Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus.


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Unsteady states: America’s piecemeal reopening
22 perc 1447. rész

Some governors are co-ordinating mutual lockdown plans, others are already reopening their states. That haphazardness bodes ill in the absence of widespread testing and tracing. The pandemic is kicking an industry that was already down: newspapers’ readerships are up, but profits are through the floor. And, reflecting on the life of a saintly obstetric surgeon in Ethiopia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

 

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The Economist Asks: Isabel Allende
25 perc 1446. rész

As billions of people remain in lockdown to stem the coronavirus, Anne McElvoy asks the Chilean author whether imagination is the cure for isolation. Allende, who lives in California, talks about why she loves her adopted home and her hopes for the political future of Latin America. Plus, long lunches, hard truths with Pablo Neruda, and the urgent beauty of falling in love and getting married again in her seventies.


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar
22 perc 1445. rész

The Rohingya genocide was just one of many sectarian flashpoints in Rakine state; now a slick separatist insurgency is getting the better of Myanmar’s army. America is floundering in its bid to win the 5G mobile-technology race; we ask what options it has. And denying locked-down Sri Lankans booze has driven them to home-brewing. For full access to print, di